Less Sleep Leads to Fewer Memories
  • Jun 22, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 14:14 mins

(originally aired May 11, 2017) Guest: Rick Huganir, PhD, Director of the Johns Hopkins University Department of Neuroscience When you’re cramming on a deadline late at night, or frustrated by a problem you can’t seem to fix, maybe you’ve been given the advice to “just sleep on it.” A recent Johns Hopkins University study shows that that’s probably a good idea. The study was done in mice and found that while they were sleeping, their brains were hard at work reconfiguring lessons learned during the day into memories that changed the mice’s behavior the next day. The researchers believe a similar thing happens when humans sleep.

Other Segments

How to Tackle Cyber-Bullying

19 MINS

(originally aired Feb. 21, 2017) Guest: Carrie Goldman, Author of “Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear” According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, about half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Last year, during her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump said she had plans to make it her focus as First Lady. And rightfully so, since she and her 11-year-old son Barron have both experienced it firsthand before and after the election. Yet, five months after the inauguration, the First Lady has been slow to put anything specific in motion. Earlier this year, we spoke with Carrie Goldman about what parents and teachers can do to tackle the problem.

(originally aired Feb. 21, 2017) Guest: Carrie Goldman, Author of “Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear” According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, about half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Last year, during her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump said she had plans to make it her focus as First Lady. And rightfully so, since she and her 11-year-old son Barron have both experienced it firsthand before and after the election. Yet, five months after the inauguration, the First Lady has been slow to put anything specific in motion. Earlier this year, we spoke with Carrie Goldman about what parents and teachers can do to tackle the problem.