Tech Transfer: Tremor Measurement
  • Mar 16, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 21:29 mins

(1:20:52) Guests: Nathan Stanford, CEO and co-founder of Vykon Technologies  Dave Brown, BYU Technology Transfer office  Matt Durrant, CTO of Vykon Technologies  Cameron Hadley, CTO of Vykon Technologies  For the millions of Americans who suffer from movement disorders – like tremors associated with Parkinson’s disease – a simple smile or sipping from a glass can be a challenge. To date the tools for accurately diagnosing movement disorders and tracking their progression over time have been limited – and costly. A research assistant in BYU’s Neuromechanics Lab has a different solution.  “Movement disorders are very complicated and difficult to diagnose,” says Stanford.  “We work a lot with people who have a central tremor. It’s a type of tremor that’s diagnosed by what’s called exclusion. It’s a relatively fast tremor, predominant in older populations. It’s not going to really hamper someone’s life where they will die but it really messes with quality of life,” explains Stanford.  “We are tracking and monitoring the tremor. You will be able to use this device on a daily basis and receive accurate data to take back to your neurologist and track your tremor,” says Stanford on his company called Vykon Technologies.

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Money and Politics

18 MINS

Guest: Michael Barber, Political Science at BYU  Americans are more politically polarized than at any other point in the last 20 years, according to Pew Research. So it stands to reason that our elected leaders in Congress – and even in statehouses around the country – are also polarized in their views, votes and rhetoric, right?  Well, what if it isn’t as simple as that? What if money has a lot more to do with the polarized picture of politics in America?   Money is “definitely an important part of the electoral process,” says Barber. “The one that has more money to spend in advertising or get out the vote candidates is likely to fare better on Election Day.”  “Legislators are nervous about losing money they could miss out on in the future. They behave in a way so that they can please those who contribute to their campaign,” says Barber.

Guest: Michael Barber, Political Science at BYU  Americans are more politically polarized than at any other point in the last 20 years, according to Pew Research. So it stands to reason that our elected leaders in Congress – and even in statehouses around the country – are also polarized in their views, votes and rhetoric, right?  Well, what if it isn’t as simple as that? What if money has a lot more to do with the polarized picture of politics in America?   Money is “definitely an important part of the electoral process,” says Barber. “The one that has more money to spend in advertising or get out the vote candidates is likely to fare better on Election Day.”  “Legislators are nervous about losing money they could miss out on in the future. They behave in a way so that they can please those who contribute to their campaign,” says Barber.