Career Help for Millennials

Career Help for Millennials

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Counterterrorism, All Souls Day, Sequoias, Careers for Millennials

Episode: Counterterrorism, All Souls Day, Sequoias, Careers for Millennials

  • Nov 2, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 15:52 mins

Guest: Craig Watkins, PhD, Professor of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin Millennials now comprise a larger share of the American workforce than any other population segment, according to 2015 Census data. The Pew Research Center says that means that one in three workers is between the ages of 18 and 34.  Millennials need a different kind of workplace. And, just as importantly, they’re entering the workforce in a very tough economy where stable, meaningful employment is elusive. So they’re getting creative about making a living, often on the margin of the traditional economy.  Prof. Watkins’ website to help Millennials develop careers can be found at www.doinginnovation.org.

Other Segments

Tech Transfer: Seed Coatings

23m

Guests: Matthew Madsen, PhD, Professor of Plant Science at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Western wildfires have become more frequent and more intense in the last several decades – partly because of an invasive weed called cheat grass. It springs up fast and is unappetizing to cattle, sheep and wild birds like the sage grouse. So, come peak fire season, the cheat grass is prime tinder. And once a blaze sweeps through the range, what do you suppose grows back quickest?  Cheat grass, because it doesn’t need much water and it easily beats out native grasses.  Rangeland managers and researchers are spending millions of dollars in a race to give those native grasses a better chance.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

Guests: Matthew Madsen, PhD, Professor of Plant Science at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Western wildfires have become more frequent and more intense in the last several decades – partly because of an invasive weed called cheat grass. It springs up fast and is unappetizing to cattle, sheep and wild birds like the sage grouse. So, come peak fire season, the cheat grass is prime tinder. And once a blaze sweeps through the range, what do you suppose grows back quickest?  Cheat grass, because it doesn’t need much water and it easily beats out native grasses.  Rangeland managers and researchers are spending millions of dollars in a race to give those native grasses a better chance.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

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