• Jun 21, 2019 10:00 pm
  • 12:24 mins

(Originally aired March 26, 2019) Guest: Amber Rollins and Whitney Rodden from KidsandCars.org It’s the scary time of year when temperatures soar and the risk of a child dying in a hot car rises along with the thermometer. Vehicle-related injuries are a top killer of children, including hot car tragedies and rollover accidents. Earlier this year we spoke with safety advocate Whitney Rodden and KidsandCars.org director Amber Rollins about how to “Childproof Your Ride.”

Other Segments

Kossula's Story of Enslavement, Published 87 Years After It Was Written

23 MINS

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”