Can a President’s Words Be Used in Court?, Intellectual Property and China, Training Coaches to Spot Child Abuse

Can a President’s Words Be Used in Court?, Intellectual Property and China, Training Coaches to Spot Child Abuse

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • May 29, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 1:43:26 mins
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Can a President’s Words Be Used in Court? Guest: Kate Shaw, JD, Associate Professor of Law and the Co-Director of the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy, Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University We’re not used to getting so much unvarnished commentary from a modern US President, so the Supreme Court is now wrestling with how seriously to take President Trump’s words. They’re looking specifically at the President’s frequent campaign rhetoric calling for a ban on Muslims entering the US. Are those comments proof that the travel restrictions Trump enacted shortly after taking office were intended to discriminate against Muslims – and should that invalidate the travel ban?  Also, just last week, a federal judge ruled that the President cannot block people from commenting on or retweeting his Tweets. A number of people who say they’ve been blocked by Trump on Twitter because they’ve criticized or mocked him have brought that lawsuit.  Are Tariffs the Best Way to Win a Trade War with China? Guests: Eric Priest, LLM, JD, Associate Professor of Law, University of Oregon; Sean Pager, JD, Professor of Law, Michigan State University The US trade war with China is an on-again, off-again affair. As of today, it’s back on. President Trump announced he is moving ahead with a 25% tariff on $50-billion worth of Chinese imports and says he’ll impose new limits on Chinese investment in American high-tech companies. At the root of Trump’s concern is China’s unfair use of stolen intellectual property, like patented software and designs. The hope is that taxing Chinese products at a higher rate as they come into the US will make it so hard for Chinese companies to compete that China will get serious about enforcing intellectual property protections.  Parent Previews—"Solo"  Guest: Rod Gustafson, Film Reviewer at ParentPreviews.com The swaggering mercenary of the Star Wars universe made famous by Harrison Ford got his own origin story movie over the weekend, “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”  Showcasing the Dignity of Indigenous People Guest: Dana Gluckstein, Internationally Acclaimed Photographer, Author of “DIGNITY: In Honor of the Rights of Indigenous People” As a young woman in her 20s, Dana Gluckstein felt called to travel to remote places and photograph the people she calls “ancient ones.” But not as a documentarian or journalist, but as a bridge between the modern world and disappearing cultures. The portraits of indigenous people she’s taken over decades are intimate and intense – and they’ve earned her international acclaim. More than 50 of the photos are currently on display at the BYU Museum of Art here in Provo through the end of September.  Training Coaches to Spot Child Abuse Guest: Dawn Anderson-Butcher, PhD, MSW, Professor of Social Work, Executive Director of the LiFEsports Initiative, The Ohio State University Every summer, hundreds of thousands of kids across the US participate in youth sports camps. The Ohio State University has used its popular Buckeye Sports Camps as an opportunity to train adult coaches and staff on how to recognize and report child abuse and neglect.  Worlds Awaiting: "The Great American Read" Guest: Rachael Wadham, Host of “World’s Awaiting” on BYUradio, Education and Juvenile Collections Librarian, Brigham Young University "The Great American Read" is an eight-part television series that celebrates the power of reading with reference to viewers' selections of their favorite 100 reads.

Episode Segments

Are Tariffs the Best Way to Win a Trade War with China?

21m

Guests: Eric Priest, LLM, JD, Associate Professor of Law, University of Oregon; Sean Pager, JD, Professor of Law, Michigan State University The US trade war with China is an on-again, off-again affair. As of today, it’s back on. President Trump announced he is moving ahead with a 25% tariff on $50-billion worth of Chinese imports and says he’ll impose new limits on Chinese investment in American high-tech companies. At the root of Trump’s concern is China’s unfair use of stolen intellectual property, like patented software and designs. The hope is that taxing Chinese products at a higher rate as they come into the US will make it so hard for Chinese companies to compete that China will get serious about enforcing intellectual property protections.

Guests: Eric Priest, LLM, JD, Associate Professor of Law, University of Oregon; Sean Pager, JD, Professor of Law, Michigan State University The US trade war with China is an on-again, off-again affair. As of today, it’s back on. President Trump announced he is moving ahead with a 25% tariff on $50-billion worth of Chinese imports and says he’ll impose new limits on Chinese investment in American high-tech companies. At the root of Trump’s concern is China’s unfair use of stolen intellectual property, like patented software and designs. The hope is that taxing Chinese products at a higher rate as they come into the US will make it so hard for Chinese companies to compete that China will get serious about enforcing intellectual property protections.