Do School Suspensions Reduce School Violence?

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Jun 21, 2019 10:00 pm
  • 11:08 mins

(Originally aired February 27, 2019) Guest: Charles Bell, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Sciences, Illinois State University Millions of kids get suspended from public schools around the US every year, and a new study from the ACLU found that schools that suspend the most are all in Hawaii. Suspension is a way to punish a student for seriously bad behavior, alert the parents that the school means business and keep the other students at the school safe. But kicking a kid out of school for a few days or weeks may not do any of those things.

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Kossula's Story of Enslavement, Published 87 Years After It Was Written

23 MINS

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”