Food Insecurity
  • Apr 15, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 19:12 mins

Guest: Hilary Seligman, associate professor at the University of California San Francisco To be food insecure means that you don't have enough money afford enough nutritious food for a healthy lifestyle. One in 7 Americans live in a food insecure household. But that does not mean that one in seven Americans are perpetually hungry or losing weight. In fact, the irony of food insecurity in America is that it has a tendency to lead-in many cases-to obesity. Dr. Hilary Seligman calls this the "obesity-hunger paradox."

Other Segments

Redesigning Tax Forms

13 MINS

Guest: Joseph Bankman, professor of law and business at Stanford University and an expert in the field of tax law Tax forms are notoriously confusing and getting help from the IRS is increasingly rare. The commissioner of the IRS said this week customer service at the agency is abysmal, due to budget cuts: six out of every ten people who call the IRS for help can't even get through to a representative. While the experience is painful for taxpayers, it's also costing the government a lot of money. Stanford University law and business professor Joseph Bankman says that redesigning the tax forms to be simpler and more direct would encourage people to be more truthful in their filing and cut down on the more than $400 billion the government loses to tax evaders each year.

Guest: Joseph Bankman, professor of law and business at Stanford University and an expert in the field of tax law Tax forms are notoriously confusing and getting help from the IRS is increasingly rare. The commissioner of the IRS said this week customer service at the agency is abysmal, due to budget cuts: six out of every ten people who call the IRS for help can't even get through to a representative. While the experience is painful for taxpayers, it's also costing the government a lot of money. Stanford University law and business professor Joseph Bankman says that redesigning the tax forms to be simpler and more direct would encourage people to be more truthful in their filing and cut down on the more than $400 billion the government loses to tax evaders each year.

Engineering for Earthquakes

12 MINS

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Guest: Jennifer Tovar Craft, defended her thesis in BYU's College of Engineering and is headed to work for Exxon Mobil in Houston. She is the 2015 winner of BYU's 3 Minute Thesis Competition On any given day, the US Geological Survey records dozens of earthquakes happening around the world. Many are so small and deep as to not be noticed by people on the earth's surface, but others are significant enough to cause damage. The USGS says the majority of deaths and injuries from earthquakes result from damage to buildings or other structures. Hence, the importance of building codes and engineering techniques that have developed in the U.S.-many tied to major earthquakes in the 80s and 90s in tremor-prone California. While buildings today are much safer than they once were, techniques to resist seismic activity are far from perfect.