International Law, Preemie Stress, Creative Arts, Modern Press

International Law, Preemie Stress, Creative Arts, Modern Press

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jan 20, 2016 10:00 pm
  • 1:42:33 mins
Download the BYURadio Apps Listen on Apple podcastsListen on SpotifyListen on YouTube

International Law Update (1:03) Guest: Eric Jensen, BYU J. Reuben Clark Law School Prof. Jensen examines current events around the globe: the recent Iranian-US prisoner swap, Iranian sanctions, Iranian detention of US soldiers, the US bombing of Kunduz, military use of drones, and the situation in North Korea. Reducing Stress on Preemies (31:06) Guests: Joerg Graf, PhD, Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at University of Connecticut and Associate Department Head for Graduate Research and Education; Adam Matson, MD, an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Immunology, University of Connecticut and Neonatologist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center More than ten percent of babies in the US are born prematurely. That’s an enormous number of families who experience the stress of an impossibly tiny preemie hooked up to monitors and tubes in Newborn Intensive Care. It’s stressful for the babies too – and a study underway at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center aims to find out if that stress might be linked to some of the health problems premature infants experience later in life. Creative Arts Therapy (51:11) Guest: Melissa Walker, Creative Arts Therapist at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence at Walter Reed Medical Center Imagine a display of handmade masks painted with American flags or words written across the forehead or cheeks. Some have eyes. Some don’t. They’re the first exercise in a four-weak treatment program for military service members suffering from PTSD, brain injury and other psychological issues. The National Endowment for the Arts and the Department of Defense are so committed to this kind of therapy that they recently expanded a program called the Military Healing Arts Partnership at various military facilities including the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland. Tampon Tax (1:10:47) Guest: Cristina Garcia, California State Assemblymember, Bell Gardens, California The Tampon Tax. That’s what it’s been dubbed in California, where State Assemblymember Cristina Garcia made it the subject of the bill she introduced on the first day of the 2016 legislative session. It would make feminine hygiene products exempt from sales tax. Canada lifted its Tampon Tax last summer after thousands of people signed an online petition. Five states in the U.S. also exempt tampons and feminine napkins from tax. California would be the most populous state in the country to do it, if Garcia’s bill passes. A Critic of the Press (1:22:00) Guest: Jay Rosen, PhD, Associate Professor of Journalism at New York University and Founder, PressThink blog What makes you trust a specific journalist or media outlet in this day when we have so many choices and so many options coming straight to your Facebook feed? Media critic and New York University journalism professor Jay Rosen says what we consider “new media” – blogs and social media feeds – actually bear close resemblance to the press at the founding of America. Rosen’s own blog is called “PressThink.” During a visit to BYU last week, he spoke with my colleague Marcus Smith, host of Thinking Aloud.?

Episode Segments

Reducing Stress on Preemies

Jan 20, 2016
20 m

Guests: Joerg Graf, PhD, Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at University of Connecticut and Associate Department Head for Graduate Research and Education; Adam Matson, MD, an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Immunology, University of Connecticut and Neonatologist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center More than ten percent of babies in the US are born prematurely. That’s an enormous number of families who experience the stress of an impossibly tiny preemie hooked up to monitors and tubes in Newborn Intensive Care. It’s stressful for the babies too – and a study underway at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center aims to find out if that stress might be linked to some of the health problems premature infants experience later in life.

Guests: Joerg Graf, PhD, Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology at University of Connecticut and Associate Department Head for Graduate Research and Education; Adam Matson, MD, an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Immunology, University of Connecticut and Neonatologist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center More than ten percent of babies in the US are born prematurely. That’s an enormous number of families who experience the stress of an impossibly tiny preemie hooked up to monitors and tubes in Newborn Intensive Care. It’s stressful for the babies too – and a study underway at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center aims to find out if that stress might be linked to some of the health problems premature infants experience later in life.