#MeToo: The Role of Social Media in Social Change

#MeToo: The Role of Social Media in Social Change

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 719 , Segment 3

Episode: Puerto Rico & Recovery, Man Flu, #MeToo

  • Jan 5, 2018
  • 17:00 mins

Guest: Andrea Press, PhD, Professor of Media Studies and Sociology, University of Virginia The Hollywood awards season begins Sunday with the Golden Globes and the typical “what are you wearing?” conversations on the red carpet are going to go differently: Three hundred prominent women in the entertainment industry this week announced an initiative they're calling "Times Up." They're raising a legal fund to help victims of sexual assault and harassment. They're calling for legislation to punish companies that tolerate harassment. And they're asking women walking the red carpet to speak out and raise awareness by wearing black.  Celebrities have played a very prominent role in the #MeToo movement against sexual assault and harassment. Would we even be having this moment at all, if it hadn’t been beautiful actresses who got the ball rolling with their public accusations of Harvey Weinstein? And should we be troubled by that?

Other Segments

'Grief Policing' After Celebrity Deaths

20m

Guest: Katie Gach, PhD Student and Social Computing Researcher, ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado Boulder In 2017, Americans mourned the deaths of celebrities including, Mary Tyler Moore, Tom Petty, Jerry Lewis, Roger Moore, Chris Cornell and Chuck Berry. And since it was 2017, a lot of that mourning was done online—on Facebook, Twitter, in the comments of news articles. If you’ve ever posted a comment on a public website, you know that backlash to what you say can come swiftly and from anyone, anywhere. Researchers at the University of Colorado have looked into a very particular kind of backlash after celebrity deaths known as “grief policing.” Their findings say a lot about how the internet is changing grief.

Guest: Katie Gach, PhD Student and Social Computing Researcher, ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado Boulder In 2017, Americans mourned the deaths of celebrities including, Mary Tyler Moore, Tom Petty, Jerry Lewis, Roger Moore, Chris Cornell and Chuck Berry. And since it was 2017, a lot of that mourning was done online—on Facebook, Twitter, in the comments of news articles. If you’ve ever posted a comment on a public website, you know that backlash to what you say can come swiftly and from anyone, anywhere. Researchers at the University of Colorado have looked into a very particular kind of backlash after celebrity deaths known as “grief policing.” Their findings say a lot about how the internet is changing grief.