• Oct 9, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 13:06 mins

Guest: Dr. Tara Vijayan, MD, Infectious Disease, Physician and Assistant Professor, Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA It’s time to get the flu shot. And if you’re doubting whether or not you need it, consider that last year, the flu killed 80,000 Americans. That’s the highest death toll for influenza in the US in 40 years. Will this year’s flu be just as bad?

Other Segments

Yourself In 4 Letters: The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

19 MINS

Guest: Merve Emre, PhD, MPhil, Associate Professor of English, Oxford University, Fellow, Worcester College, Author, “The Personality Brokers” The most famous personality test in the world – the one that inspired all those crazy quizzes we take on social media – has a really surprising backstory. It was not developed by psychologists. The creators of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator were a mother-daughter team with no formal scientific training of any sort. But somehow their multiple choice test for sorting people into categories with four-letter codes like INTP or ESFJ has become the tool for companies, colleges, counselors - and even government agencies. The Myers-Briggs test has become a huge moneymaker – despite loads of criticism from the scientific community that it’s not really an accurate gauge of personality.

Guest: Merve Emre, PhD, MPhil, Associate Professor of English, Oxford University, Fellow, Worcester College, Author, “The Personality Brokers” The most famous personality test in the world – the one that inspired all those crazy quizzes we take on social media – has a really surprising backstory. It was not developed by psychologists. The creators of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator were a mother-daughter team with no formal scientific training of any sort. But somehow their multiple choice test for sorting people into categories with four-letter codes like INTP or ESFJ has become the tool for companies, colleges, counselors - and even government agencies. The Myers-Briggs test has become a huge moneymaker – despite loads of criticism from the scientific community that it’s not really an accurate gauge of personality.