DACA Deadline, Why We're Awkward, The Tinder Trap

DACA Deadline, Why We're Awkward, The Tinder Trap

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Oct 5, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 1:42:54 mins
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Sticking Points in the Debate to Protect DACA Recipients Guest: Charles Kuck, Immigration Attorney, Former President of American Immigration Lawyers Association, Adjunct Law Professor, Emory University An important deadline is arriving for participants in the DACA program that gives two-year work permits to undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children. At President Trump’s order, a six-month wind down period is underway for DACA and no new applicants are being accepted. But there are tens-of-thousands of young immigrants currently safe from deportation under DACA whose two-year work permits will expire in the next few months. And this is the last day they could apply to renew the permit. Those who don’t could face deportation, unless Congress intervenes in the next few months. Myanmar Dissident Speaks Out Guest: Thein Than Oo, General Secretary, Independent Lawyer’s Association of Myanmar The persecution of a Muslim minority group called the Rohingya in Myanmar is drawing international scrutiny to the status of the country’s fragile democracy. Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy party control the civilian government, but the military in Myanmar retains significant power and it is conducting the violent raids on Rohingya villages that have caused half a million people to flee across the border to Bangladesh. We are joined by a man who has been in a struggle against Myanmar’s military for decades. Thein Than Oo is a human rights lawyer and former political prisoner from Myanmar. Realism with Restraint in US Foreign Policy Guest: John Allen Gay, Executive Director, John Quincy Adams Society What to do about North Korea’s escalating nuclear threats? How to stop ISIS and resolve the bloody civil war in Syria? What to do in Afghanistan, where more than a decade of American military presence has failed to bring peace and stability? What to do about Yemen, where millions of people are dying of famine and disease while Saudi Arabia and Iran play out their rivalry backing opposite sides of Yemen’s civil war?  These things are just a partial list of the complicated challenges facing world leaders. The question facing US leaders is how involved we should be in the conflicts happening outside our own borders. President Trump has said time and again that America’s needs and interest are his top priority. But speaking to the UN recently, he used another phrase to describe his foreign policy: principled realism. How New is the New Wonder Woman? (Originally aired on Jun. 6, 2017) Guest: Sarah Langsdale, PhD, Lecturer of Philosophy and Religion, University of North Texas If somehow you missed Wonder Woman on the big screen this summer, you can still catch her streaming or on DVD right now. This summer’s Wonder Woman was a relief to fans of female superheroes, who were worried that Hollywood was going to offer up yet another one-dimensional take on female power rooted solely in sexuality or vengeance. Why We’re Awkward (Originally aired on May 30, 2017) Guest: Ty Tashiro, PhD, Psychologist and Author of “Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome” No one is immune to awkwardness, whether it’s getting a piece of food stuck in your teeth, forgetting the name of a former neighbor, or tripping over your own feet in a room full of people you’re trying to impress. But, for some people, life is a steady stream of awkward moments, and it turns out there is a reason why. But it's okay because awkwardness can be awesome. Swipe Left? Not So Fast (Originally aired on May 30, 2017) Guest: Jeffrey Hall, PhD, Professor of Communication Studies, University of Kansas Online dating is no longer the taboo thing it used to be. Services like Tinder and Match are now common ways people of all ages find potential partners. But all the swiping and rating of people based on their photos may be ruining our chances of really enjoying the company of a date when we finally meet in person. Discover your flirting style at Jeffrey Hall's website here.

Episode Segments

Sticking Points in the Debate to Protect DACA Recipients

Oct 5, 2017

Guest: Charles Kuck, Immigration Attorney, Former President of American Immigration Lawyers Association, Adjunct Law Professor, Emory University An important deadline is arriving for participants in the DACA program that gives two-year work permits to undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children. At President Trump’s order, a six-month wind down period is underway for DACA and no new applicants are being accepted. But there are tens-of-thousands of young immigrants currently safe from deportation under DACA whose two-year work permits will expire in the next few months. And this is the last day they could apply to renew the permit. Those who don’t could face deportation, unless Congress intervenes in the next few months.

Guest: Charles Kuck, Immigration Attorney, Former President of American Immigration Lawyers Association, Adjunct Law Professor, Emory University An important deadline is arriving for participants in the DACA program that gives two-year work permits to undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children. At President Trump’s order, a six-month wind down period is underway for DACA and no new applicants are being accepted. But there are tens-of-thousands of young immigrants currently safe from deportation under DACA whose two-year work permits will expire in the next few months. And this is the last day they could apply to renew the permit. Those who don’t could face deportation, unless Congress intervenes in the next few months.

Myanmar Dissident Speaks Out

Oct 5, 2017

Guest: Thein Than Oo, General Secretary, Independent Lawyer’s Association of Myanmar The persecution of a Muslim minority group called the Rohingya in Myanmar is drawing international scrutiny to the status of the country’s fragile democracy. Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy party control the civilian government, but the military in Myanmar retains significant power and it is conducting the violent raids on Rohingya villages that have caused half a million people to flee across the border to Bangladesh. We are joined by a man who has been in a struggle against Myanmar’s military for decades. Thein Than Oo is a human rights lawyer and former political prisoner from Myanmar.

Guest: Thein Than Oo, General Secretary, Independent Lawyer’s Association of Myanmar The persecution of a Muslim minority group called the Rohingya in Myanmar is drawing international scrutiny to the status of the country’s fragile democracy. Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy party control the civilian government, but the military in Myanmar retains significant power and it is conducting the violent raids on Rohingya villages that have caused half a million people to flee across the border to Bangladesh. We are joined by a man who has been in a struggle against Myanmar’s military for decades. Thein Than Oo is a human rights lawyer and former political prisoner from Myanmar.

Realism with Restraint in US Foreign Policy

Oct 5, 2017

Guest: John Allen Gay, Executive Director, John Quincy Adams Society What to do about North Korea’s escalating nuclear threats? How to stop ISIS and resolve the bloody civil war in Syria? What to do in Afghanistan, where more than a decade of American military presence has failed to bring peace and stability? What to do about Yemen, where millions of people are dying of famine and disease while Saudi Arabia and Iran play out their rivalry backing opposite sides of Yemen’s civil war?  These things are just a partial list of the complicated challenges facing world leaders. The question facing US leaders is how involved we should be in the conflicts happening outside our own borders. President Trump has said time and again that America’s needs and interest are his top priority. But speaking to the UN recently, he used another phrase to describe his foreign policy: principled realism.

Guest: John Allen Gay, Executive Director, John Quincy Adams Society What to do about North Korea’s escalating nuclear threats? How to stop ISIS and resolve the bloody civil war in Syria? What to do in Afghanistan, where more than a decade of American military presence has failed to bring peace and stability? What to do about Yemen, where millions of people are dying of famine and disease while Saudi Arabia and Iran play out their rivalry backing opposite sides of Yemen’s civil war?  These things are just a partial list of the complicated challenges facing world leaders. The question facing US leaders is how involved we should be in the conflicts happening outside our own borders. President Trump has said time and again that America’s needs and interest are his top priority. But speaking to the UN recently, he used another phrase to describe his foreign policy: principled realism.