Emily Dickinson Lexicon

Emily Dickinson Lexicon

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 239 , Segment 3

Episode: Angry America, Changing the Game, Emily Dickinson Lexicon

  • Feb 24, 2016 10:00 pm
  • 16:31 mins

Guest: Cynthia Hallen, PhD, Associate Professor of Linguistics and English Language at BYU  One of the most significant writers in American history was virtually unknown during her lifetime. Poet Emily Dickinson was an introvert. She hardly left the house, never married, and maintained many of her friendships through correspondence alone. It was only after she died that her poems became popular. Emily Dickinson’s poems are much like her life; there is more to them than meets the eye, full of allusion and ambiguity, puns and idioms.

Other Segments

Human Rights Activism in China

24 MINS

Guest: Nanfu Wang, Independent Filmmaker   To what lengths would you go to reveal injustice? Would you speak up despite disapproval from your neighbors? Use hidden cameras to document it? Would you be willing to face interrogation by national security agents? Filmmaker Nanfu Wang claims she witnessed all the above while filming “Hooligan Sparrow”, a human rights documentary which recently premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. It was filmed in 2013, when Wang returned to her native China to document a protest led by an activist who calls herself “Hooligan Sparrow.” It wasn’t long before Wang became a character in her own film, capturing on camera the lengths to which the Chinese government was willing to go to keep her from telling those human rights activists.

Guest: Nanfu Wang, Independent Filmmaker   To what lengths would you go to reveal injustice? Would you speak up despite disapproval from your neighbors? Use hidden cameras to document it? Would you be willing to face interrogation by national security agents? Filmmaker Nanfu Wang claims she witnessed all the above while filming “Hooligan Sparrow”, a human rights documentary which recently premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. It was filmed in 2013, when Wang returned to her native China to document a protest led by an activist who calls herself “Hooligan Sparrow.” It wasn’t long before Wang became a character in her own film, capturing on camera the lengths to which the Chinese government was willing to go to keep her from telling those human rights activists.