• Nov 16, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 9:30 mins

Guest: Kurt Repanshek, Founder and Editor of NationalParksTraveler.com – the leading online resource for National Parks-related news  As winter approaches the temperature drops and the snow begins to fall. Sometimes there’s a powerful urge to snuggle up and wait out the winter from the comfort of a chair by the window. Shame that, because apparently there’s a lot to be appreciated out-of-doors in winter. Particularly in the country’s National Parks.  National Parks Traveler is just out with its Essential Park Guide to winter adventures.

Other Segments

Rise of the Islamic State

22 MINS

Guest: Cole Bunzel, Author of “From Paper State to Caliphate: The Ideology of the Islamic State” which was published by the Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World  The Islamic State terror groups has claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks in Paris over the weekend that killed more than 120 people. The Islamic State also claimed responsibility for two deadly bombings in Lebanon earlier last week and the apparent bombing of a plane carrying more than two-hundred Russian tourists that crashed in Egypt a week and a half ago. All of this from a group once considered by US and other Western officials as less of a threat than Al Qaeda. How did the Islamic State become so powerful and are its goals changing as it rises?  You can read the full report here

Guest: Cole Bunzel, Author of “From Paper State to Caliphate: The Ideology of the Islamic State” which was published by the Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World  The Islamic State terror groups has claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks in Paris over the weekend that killed more than 120 people. The Islamic State also claimed responsibility for two deadly bombings in Lebanon earlier last week and the apparent bombing of a plane carrying more than two-hundred Russian tourists that crashed in Egypt a week and a half ago. All of this from a group once considered by US and other Western officials as less of a threat than Al Qaeda. How did the Islamic State become so powerful and are its goals changing as it rises?  You can read the full report here

Proposition 47 Prisoners

19 MINS

Guest: Milena Blake, JD, Staff Attorney on Stanford’s Justice Advocacy Project  Overcrowded prisons are a problem nationwide, but they’ve become so serious in California that the US Supreme Court ordered a significant reduction in prison headcount by next year. Initially, the plan involved releasing some prisoners early and transferring others from federal prisons to county-run jails with more space.  Then California voters got involved. Last year they passed a proposition that converted six types of non-violent felonies into misdemeanors. And it’s retroactive, so a Stanford Law School report says some 13,000 people doing time in California prisons and jails on those offenses have had their sentences reduced and been released in the last year.

Guest: Milena Blake, JD, Staff Attorney on Stanford’s Justice Advocacy Project  Overcrowded prisons are a problem nationwide, but they’ve become so serious in California that the US Supreme Court ordered a significant reduction in prison headcount by next year. Initially, the plan involved releasing some prisoners early and transferring others from federal prisons to county-run jails with more space.  Then California voters got involved. Last year they passed a proposition that converted six types of non-violent felonies into misdemeanors. And it’s retroactive, so a Stanford Law School report says some 13,000 people doing time in California prisons and jails on those offenses have had their sentences reduced and been released in the last year.

Tech Transfer: Cancer Treatment

23 MINS

Guest: Marc Hansen, PhD, Professor in the Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology at Brigham Young University; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Can you hazard a guess here – what’s the leading cause of death among Americans? The Centers for Disease Control says Heart Disease, which kills more than 600,000 people a year. Not far behind in the number two spot? Cancer. Accidents are actually the fourth highest cause of death, but the number is much, much smaller – 140,000 per year.  So, let’s look at number two: Cancer. Among the challenges to treating it the many different types that can arise and the aggressive way in which cancer cells grow - and even become resistant - to drug treatment.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

Guest: Marc Hansen, PhD, Professor in the Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology at Brigham Young University; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Can you hazard a guess here – what’s the leading cause of death among Americans? The Centers for Disease Control says Heart Disease, which kills more than 600,000 people a year. Not far behind in the number two spot? Cancer. Accidents are actually the fourth highest cause of death, but the number is much, much smaller – 140,000 per year.  So, let’s look at number two: Cancer. Among the challenges to treating it the many different types that can arise and the aggressive way in which cancer cells grow - and even become resistant - to drug treatment.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.