Worlds Awaiting: ALA Book Award Predictions

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Feb 7, 2018
  • 15:42 mins

Guest: Rachel Wadham, Host, Worlds Awaiting, BYUradio  Rachel predicts winners at this weekend's American Library Association's Book Awards.

Other Segments

3-D Printing Ship Repairs

11 MINS

Guest: Rainer Hebert, PhD, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut The US Navy’s aircraft carriers are enormous – 1,000 feet long, capable of carrying airplanes (obviously) and a crew of 6,000 people. They’re basically self-contained cities at sea that will stay out for months at a time. But routinely, the Navy has to take these enormous ships offline to inspect and make repairs, because if something breaks while they’re at sea, it’s really expensive and time-consuming to come all the way back to shore for a fix. The Navy would like to extend the amount of time ships can stay out to sea between maintenance visits, but they need a better way to monitor critical equipment on the ship in real-time. And it would be even better if they could somehow manufacture the repair parts right on the ship.

Guest: Rainer Hebert, PhD, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut The US Navy’s aircraft carriers are enormous – 1,000 feet long, capable of carrying airplanes (obviously) and a crew of 6,000 people. They’re basically self-contained cities at sea that will stay out for months at a time. But routinely, the Navy has to take these enormous ships offline to inspect and make repairs, because if something breaks while they’re at sea, it’s really expensive and time-consuming to come all the way back to shore for a fix. The Navy would like to extend the amount of time ships can stay out to sea between maintenance visits, but they need a better way to monitor critical equipment on the ship in real-time. And it would be even better if they could somehow manufacture the repair parts right on the ship.

Sea-Turtle Hatchlings Adapting to Humans

18 MINS

Guest: Sarah Milton, PhD, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Florida Atlantic University Sea turtles undertake a hazardous journey as soon as they hatch on the beach where their mother laid them. Usually under the cover of night, they emerge from the nest and head toward the surf where they’ll swim out to sea. That is, unless there are a lot of lights or obstacles in their path. If they become disoriented, then a trip that should take a few minutes might turn into hours of wandering before they finally make it to the water’s edge. Scientists at Florida Atlantic University wanted to know if all that extra energy would hurt a hatchlings’ ability to swim once they made it. So they made turtle treadmills to find out.

Guest: Sarah Milton, PhD, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Florida Atlantic University Sea turtles undertake a hazardous journey as soon as they hatch on the beach where their mother laid them. Usually under the cover of night, they emerge from the nest and head toward the surf where they’ll swim out to sea. That is, unless there are a lot of lights or obstacles in their path. If they become disoriented, then a trip that should take a few minutes might turn into hours of wandering before they finally make it to the water’s edge. Scientists at Florida Atlantic University wanted to know if all that extra energy would hurt a hatchlings’ ability to swim once they made it. So they made turtle treadmills to find out.