• Mar 2, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 18:46 mins

(33:11) Guest: Helena Schotland, Division Sleep Specialist in Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Health Systems  Some of the latest research indicates that children diagnosed with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder may actually be suffering the effects of sleep apnea. And the extreme fatigue people with MS experience could also be a result of sleep apnea.  “As people age, unfortunately we get kind of floppy on the outside. As we age, we also get floppy on the inside. People may develop sleep apnea over time,” says Schotland.  “The brain often wakes up for a split second and you go back to sleep and you don’t even realize it. But if you do this 100 times during the night it’s as if someone comes and pokes you and wakes you up 100 times in the night. You need sleep that is not interrupted—what we called consolidated sleep where you fall asleep but also stay asleep for an extended period of time,” says Schotland.  “We’re finding many more people,” says Schotland, “who have sleep apnea who might have been diagnosed with something else in the past.”

Other Segments

Parent Previews: Lazarus Effect and Leonard Nimoy

13 MINS

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Tech Transfer

24 MINS

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”