• Mar 2, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 17:01 mins

(16:10) Guest: Wade Jacoby, Professor of Political Science at BYU  There are undoubtedly leaders of some European countries shaking their heads right now and wondering if it was such a good idea after all to switch to a common European currency. They’ve been forced to agree to yet another round of bailout funds for Greece, whose debt crisis has been dragging on the rest of the Eurozone for years. This latest bailout is only temporary – lasting four more months – and requires Greek officials to commit to tough reforms, including sharp tax hikes and budget cuts. Such harsh measures have already pushed Greek unemployment to over 25 percent in the last several years. If Greece’s economy were allowed to collapse the other 19 countries tied to it by a common currency would also suffer. You have to wonder if this is an eventuality those countries foresaw when they signed on to use the Euro.  There would be some consequences for the rest of the Euro zone.  “..having a weak country like Greece join stronger countries like Germany and the Netherlands, it weakens the value of the Euro,” says Jacoby.  “It’s a pretty complicated thing to do. It can be done, but it’s not easy,” says Jacoby on setting up a new currency.

Other Segments

Parent Previews: Lazarus Effect and Leonard Nimoy

13 MINS

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Tech Transfer

24 MINS

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”