Ransomware
  • Mar 18, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 12:16 mins

(39:29) Guest: Dale Rowe, IT Professor and head of the BYU’s “cyber security lab”  Reports of a terrifying new type of hack called “ransomware” have been increasing lately. It’s a type of software virus that encrypts all of the data on your computer and requires that you pay a ransom before the hackers will release your files.

Other Segments

American Heritage

21 MINS

Guest: Grant Madsen, BYU history professor  Of all the aspects of early American history, none seems harder to explain than slavery. In every aspect it seems both wrong and antithetical to how Americans see themselves today. It was based on racism. It required brutal violence to maintain itself. It treated people as property. In short, it violated in almost perfect order the very ideas that animated the American Revolution—the idea that all people are created equal and that governments are instituted to protect the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  It took the nation nearly a hundred years (and a bloody civil war) to end the practice of slavery. It took another century to begin the process of undoing the racism that justified it. Today we continue to talk about and live with the legacy of this “peculiar institution” (as southerners called it).

Guest: Grant Madsen, BYU history professor  Of all the aspects of early American history, none seems harder to explain than slavery. In every aspect it seems both wrong and antithetical to how Americans see themselves today. It was based on racism. It required brutal violence to maintain itself. It treated people as property. In short, it violated in almost perfect order the very ideas that animated the American Revolution—the idea that all people are created equal and that governments are instituted to protect the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  It took the nation nearly a hundred years (and a bloody civil war) to end the practice of slavery. It took another century to begin the process of undoing the racism that justified it. Today we continue to talk about and live with the legacy of this “peculiar institution” (as southerners called it).