Sundance Film Festival: Star-crossed Lovers

Sundance Film Festival: Star-crossed Lovers

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Jan 28, 2016 11:00 pm
  • 16:04 mins

Romeo and Juliet. Othello and Desdemona. Lovers who find themselves in love with someone their family and their society reject. All that tension makes for compelling stories that we fall for over and over.  At the Sundance Film Festival, Producer Tennery Taylor has found a couple tales of star-crossed lovers, where the events of history combine against lovers who find themselves alone against the world. Today we’re talking love and war, discussing the narrative feature films “Ali and Nino” and “Sophie and the Rising Sun” that have just premiered at the Festival this week.

Other Segments

Suicide and Altitude

14 MINS

Guest: Perry Renshaw, MD, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah  By one ranking, Utah is America’s happiest state. The beautiful surroundings certainly contribute – if you’ve never seen the mountain range running along Utah’s biggest cities, you’re missing out.  But here’s a paradox that puzzles public health officials: the suicide rate in the American West – Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming—is roughly 1.5 times higher than in the rest of the nation. Researchers sometimes call it "the Suicide Belt."  Is it the landscape? The social structure? Something in the “Western mindset” that causes more people to take their own life? University of Utah psychiatry professor Perry Renshaw has proposed an intriguing hypothesis – he says it’s the altitude.

Guest: Perry Renshaw, MD, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah  By one ranking, Utah is America’s happiest state. The beautiful surroundings certainly contribute – if you’ve never seen the mountain range running along Utah’s biggest cities, you’re missing out.  But here’s a paradox that puzzles public health officials: the suicide rate in the American West – Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming—is roughly 1.5 times higher than in the rest of the nation. Researchers sometimes call it "the Suicide Belt."  Is it the landscape? The social structure? Something in the “Western mindset” that causes more people to take their own life? University of Utah psychiatry professor Perry Renshaw has proposed an intriguing hypothesis – he says it’s the altitude.