The Demise of Nuclear Power
  • Mar 9, 2018
  • 23:00 mins

(Originally aired: Sept. 11, 2017) Guest: Jeremy Carl, PhD, Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University Just a decade ago, there was talk of a “nuclear renaissance” in the US. Plans were in the works for several new nuclear plants – the first to be built in the US in 40 years. But a few months ago, construction was abandoned on two of those new nuclear reactors – they weren’t even halfway built, but had already cost 9 billion dollars. And the energy companies building them decided just to cut their losses and walk away. The future of nuclear power in America looks bleak at the moment. But Jeremy Carl says it’s not too late to save it. He’s a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and co-author of the book “Keeping the Lights on at America’s Nuclear Power Plants.”

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