The Cult of Apple
  • Sep 14, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 19:15 mins

Guest: Tim Bajarin, President of Creative Strategies, Inc. Recognized Consultants, Analysts and Futurists covering the field of personal computers and consumer technology.  If you’ve got a smartphone, and more than half of Americans do, there’s a 40% chance it’s an iPhone. Apple came out with a new version last week with something called 3D touch.  These Apple product launches inspire breathless anticipation. Devotees will soon be lining up at Apple Stores to get the latest iPhone. The fervor, the adoration, the loyalty Apple inspired is legendary. Why?

Other Segments

Reshuffling of Marine Life

16 MINS

Guest: Ben Halpern, Ph.D., Professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and an Associate at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)  Raging wild fires in the West and shrinking ice caps at the poles are two of the more visible effects of a changing climate. But two-thirds of the Earth is underwater, and life there is changing, too.  A group of scientists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) has set out to understand how. Their latest findings suggest that as ocean temperatures rise, marine life begins to search for more suitable conditions, which has consequences for biodiversity and for communities such as fishermen who live off the sea.

Guest: Ben Halpern, Ph.D., Professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and an Associate at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)  Raging wild fires in the West and shrinking ice caps at the poles are two of the more visible effects of a changing climate. But two-thirds of the Earth is underwater, and life there is changing, too.  A group of scientists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) has set out to understand how. Their latest findings suggest that as ocean temperatures rise, marine life begins to search for more suitable conditions, which has consequences for biodiversity and for communities such as fishermen who live off the sea.