Cold office temperatures harm women's productivity, study finds

Cold office temperatures harm women's productivity, study finds

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Jun 24, 2019 10:00 pm
  • 17:42 mins

Guest: Tom Chang, Associate Professor of Finance and Business Economics, USC Marshall School of Business Summer is sweater-season for women who work in office buildings. I’ll sometimes get into my sweltering car after work and just revel in the heat for a moment after being in the chilly office all day. Most buildings are set to the ideal temperature for the metabolism of a typical male, which different from a typical female. But it’s not just a matter of comfort. Economist Tom Chang at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business found, in some recently-published work, that women perform better when they’re not shivering at their desks.

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Research Shows Bats Demonstrate Surprising Longevity

14 MINS

Guest: Gerald Wilkinson, Professor of Biology at the University of Maryland For most mammals, the larger they are the longer they live. Larger mammals have slower metabolisms and longer lifespans as a result. That's why most pet owners are around longer than their animals. The notable exception to this rule is the bat, which lives much longer than other mammals of comparable size. In fact, researchers recently published that "Nineteen species of mammals live longer than humans, given their body size, of which 18 are bats." Scientists have made some remarkable discoveries as to why bats live so long. Part of it stems from body temperature fluctuation, hibernation, and differing sizes between males and females.

Guest: Gerald Wilkinson, Professor of Biology at the University of Maryland For most mammals, the larger they are the longer they live. Larger mammals have slower metabolisms and longer lifespans as a result. That's why most pet owners are around longer than their animals. The notable exception to this rule is the bat, which lives much longer than other mammals of comparable size. In fact, researchers recently published that "Nineteen species of mammals live longer than humans, given their body size, of which 18 are bats." Scientists have made some remarkable discoveries as to why bats live so long. Part of it stems from body temperature fluctuation, hibernation, and differing sizes between males and females.