Zika Update, Boomerang Fathers, Taiwan and China

Zika Update, Boomerang Fathers, Taiwan and China

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 357

  • Aug 10, 2016 9:00 pm
  • 1:39:47 mins

Zika Continues to Spread Guest: Andrew Pavia, MD, Chief of the Division of Pediatric and Infectious Diseases at the University of Utah Medical Center Four more cases of Zika were reported in Florida on Tuesday, bringing the total to 21 for a small neighborhood of Miami. That neighborhood is the only place in the continental US with “active transmission,” meaning people are getting Zika from mosquitoes there instead of from traveling to other countries with the virus. The CDC says women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant—and their partners—should not go to that Miami neighborhood.  Florida fits the profile of a place we were warned could be affected by virus, since it’s the warm, humid climate where mosquitoes that carry the virus thrive. But the first confirmed Zika death in the continental United States was not in a humid southern state – it was in Utah. And Utah is also where health officials confirmed the first case of Zika that had not come from being exposed to a mosquito or sexual contact with an infected person. Which just underscores how confusing this disease is. Boomerang Fathers Curb Depression in Girls Guest: Daphne Hernandez, PhD, Assistant Professor at the University of Houston’s Department of Health and Human Performance It’s not really a surprise to hear that children who deal with lots of family instability are more likely to suffer from symptoms of depression. But a new study published in the “Journal of Marriage and Family” says finds when a father moves out but then returns to the home—even if he cycles in out repeatedly—his daughter will actually be less depressed than if he left for good. These dads are called “boomerang fathers,” it’s a pretty fitting name. Their presence is significant, even if it’s not predictable. Is It Better to Celebrate or Commemorate Special Occasions?  Guest: Selin Malkoc, PhD, Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Ohio State University The trend in gift giving these days is to give an experience, rather than a thing. Memories last a life time, as they say. But then again, “diamonds are forever.” When it comes to marking a major life event, like a wedding or graduation, what kind of gift do you suppose will keep the memory of that moment alive longer? An experience or a gift?  Apple Seed Guest: Sam Payne, Host of BYUradio’s “The Apple Seed” Sam Payne joins us in studio to share stories of tales and tellers. Certain Group of Men Appreciate Being Nagged by Wives Guest: David Warner, PhD, Sociologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have discovered a scenario in which men like being nagged by their wives. There’s a certain set of older married men today who feel more loved when their wives harp on them about eating right, going to the doctor, taking their medicine and such.  Taiwan and China Guest: Robert Griffiths, Professor of Political Science at BYU, Former US Consul General in Shanghai, Former Foreign Service Officer in Asia Keen-eyed observers of the Olympics might have noticed something about the team from Taiwan. The island nation of 23 million people has about 60 athletes competing in Rio and just won their first gold medal of the 2016 Summer Games in women’s weightlifting. But when Hsu Shu-ching stood on the podium to accept her medal, it was not under the flag of Taiwan nor the national anthem of Taiwan. She and her fellow athletes are competing officially as “Chinese Taipei” at the Olympics, because China insists upon it. The question of Taiwan’s autonomy is a source of long-standing tension with China that’s been heightened by the arrival of the Olympics and the recent election of a Taiwanese president from a pro-independence party is raising the level of tension.