Presidential Politics, Women and the Draft, Washington Irving

Presidential Politics, Women and the Draft, Washington Irving

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jun 27, 2016 11:00 pm
  • 1:42:49 mins

Presidential Politics Guests: Grant Madsen, PhD, Professor of 20th Century US History at BYU; Chris Karpowitz, PhD, Professor of Political Science at BYU How much does it take to win the White House? President Obama raised $722 million for his re-election in 2012 and slightly more to win in 2008. Democrat Hillary Clinton is expected to raise a billion dollars for her race. Republican Donald Trump thinks he can win for a lot less and insists the latest dismal fundraising disclosure report from his campaign is nothing to worry about. Clinton raised nearly nine times more than Trump did from individual contributors during May. She finished the month with $42 million in her war chest, while Trump had a measly one million.  Trump has certainly broken many rules of traditional presidential campaigns, but can he really win without raising – and spending – as much money as his competitor?  Women and The Draft Guest: Cameron McCoy, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow of Military History at the United States Military Academy, Will Join BYU Faculty in 2017, Major in the Marine Corps Reserves Six months ago, the Pentagon cleared the way for women to serve in all combat roles in the military – including the ability to become Navy SEALs or Army Rangers if they can pass the rigorous training to qualify. So, what about the military draft? Young men between 18 and 25 are currently required to register with Selective Service in the event America needs to reinstate a draft for military service. Should young women be required to register, too?  The requirement that women register for the draft made it into a large defense bill the Senate passed overwhelmingly, but it’ll need approval from the House and President to become law.  Glass with a Past Guest: Jodi McRaney-Rusho, Recycled Glass Artist Environmental regulators are investigating factories across the country that make the beautiful, colored glass used in stained-glass windows and art. Toxic chemicals including arsenic and cadmium have been found in the smoke emitted from furnaces that make the art glass.  As a result, Utah artist Jodi McRaney-Rusho finds her particular expertise in high-demand. She’s pioneered the process of turning glass that comes from bottles and windows into recycled art – and that kind of glass doesn’t contain the dangerous heavy metals used in making art glass. If it sounds easy and rather obvious to just recycle glass into art, it’s not.  Washington Irving’s Fame in Spain Guest: Javier Villoria, PhD, Dean of the College of Education at the University of Granada Washington Irving is most famous in America for writing The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle. In fact, he’s considered the first professional writer America ever produced – the first person to make a living with his pen. But Washington Irving might be just as famous in Spain, where he travelled for a bit in the 1820s and then served as US Ambassador in the 1840s.  There are even Spanish roads and businesses named after him.  Parent Previews Guest: Rod Gustaffson, Film Reviewer at ParentPreviews.com  20 years and nobody seems to care, based on the box office take for Independence Day: Resurgence. It’s a sequel to Independence Day which came out in 1996 starring Will Smith. That film was a big hit. This new one, not so much.  Anti-Aging Compound Guests: Mike Alder, Director of the BYU Technology Transfer Office; Edwin Lephart, PhD, BYU Physiology and Developmental Biology Professor at BYU Everybody who’s hit middle age starts to think about how to roll the clock back. Whether you’re concerned about the sagging and wrinkling of your face or you’re a man experiencing the many challenges that come with an enlarged prostate. Both conditions could potentially be addressed with a naturally occurring molecule called equol. You’re not going believe where it comes from.