Retirement Advisers, Elite Climber, Big Data to Predict Suicide

Retirement Advisers, Elite Climber, Big Data to Predict Suicide

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 541

  • Apr 27, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 51:13 mins

Is Your Retirement Adviser Really Looking Out for You? Guest: Bronson Argyle, PhD, Assistant Professor of Finance, BYU Marriott School of Management You are probably paying more in brokerage fees than you need to be. And you’re probably being steered toward more expensive investment funds than you need to be, because – believe it or not – there is no rule preventing retirement advisers from pointing you toward investment funds that give them a better kickback. Americans saving for retirement are losing in the range of $17 billion a year because of financial advice that’s not in their best interest. That estimate came from the Obama Administration’s Council of Economic Advisers and led to the creation of a new rule meant to fix the problem. It was supposed to take effect in April, but President Trump delayed it – and may even scrap it entirely.  Elite Climber Beth Rodden on Balancing Success  Guest: Beth Rodden, Renowned Rock Climber Beth Rodden is an elite rock climber who has spent nights in a cocoon bolted into sheer rock mountain faces, established some of the hardest climbing routes in the world ever set by a woman, and has even escaped a kidnapping by militants in Central Asia. She’s got nerves of steel, all wrapped up in a tiny 5" 1' frame.  But Beth Rodden has learned some of her hardest lessons from everyday life as she’s learned to balance elite rock climbing, marriage and parenting. Her story is featured in this month’s edition of Outside magazine. How Big Data Could Help Prevent Suicide Guest: Jessica Ribeiro, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Florida State University About 800 people die by suicide every week. That’s enough people to fill two commercial airliners. Could you imagine the uproar if two planes crashed every week, killing everyone on board? What new laws or research might that prompt? And yet, after decades of study, scientists and doctors say their ability to predict who will commit suicide is still only about as good as a random guess.  But big data may offer new hope. A team of researchers analyzed two million medical records using a technique called “machine learning” and found they could predict, with 80-percent accuracy, which patients would die by suicide two years in the future. Find more information about the app Professor Ribeiro mentioned here.  Answers About Autism (Originally aired Feb. 10, 2017) Guest: Mikle South, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, BYU; Terisa Gabrielsen, PhD, Professor of School Psychology, BYU; Jon Cox, PhD Licensed Psychologist and Clinical Professor, BYU; Rebecca Lundwall, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, BYU For parents and for public health experts, autism is confusing and frustrating. Autism can vary widely from one person to the next. In 2013, a range of disorders including Asperger’s Syndrome were all classified under one umbrella term known as “autism spectrum disorder,” which may have served to confuse the matter further. So, today we’re going to try and get some answers about what autism is, what causes it, and how it can be treated. For more information visit BYU's website on autism here.