Wearable Sensors Can Predict Illness
  • May 11, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 13:50 mins

(originally aired Jan 31, 2017) Guest: Michael Snyder, PhD, Professor of Genetics, Stanford Your Fitbit can tell you how many steps you took in a day, but what if it could pick up subtle cues that you might be sick, even before you realize you’re not feeling well? The technology to do that is pretty much already here. What we need is computer programs that can collect that steady stream of data about our body temperature, heart rate, and oxygen levels and make sense of it.  Earlier this year, researchers at Stanford University published some preliminary work in the journal PLOS One that showed it’s possible.

Other Segments

Text Message Thrillers

24 MINS

(Originally aired Sep 14, 2016) Guest: Prerna Gupta, Founder and CEO of Hooked "Dracula," "The Screwtape Letters," "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" – all are examples of fiction that plays out through the exchange of letters and documents. In the digital era, authors have taken to telling stories through chains of emails between characters. No surprise that text messages are the next frontier. That’s what a startup called Hooked has tapped into. They call themselves “fiction for the Snapchat generation.” You download the app, pick a story to read and up comes the first few lines – written as a text, of course. Click “next” and another text pops up to advance the plot. It’s working so well, the founders of Hooked think they could use the data from their app to find the next “Harry Potter.”

(Originally aired Sep 14, 2016) Guest: Prerna Gupta, Founder and CEO of Hooked "Dracula," "The Screwtape Letters," "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" – all are examples of fiction that plays out through the exchange of letters and documents. In the digital era, authors have taken to telling stories through chains of emails between characters. No surprise that text messages are the next frontier. That’s what a startup called Hooked has tapped into. They call themselves “fiction for the Snapchat generation.” You download the app, pick a story to read and up comes the first few lines – written as a text, of course. Click “next” and another text pops up to advance the plot. It’s working so well, the founders of Hooked think they could use the data from their app to find the next “Harry Potter.”