Farming Doesn't Come with Insurance Benefits

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Apr 12, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 21:22 mins

(Originally aired: Aug. 29, 2017) Guest: Shoshanah Inwood, Assistant Professor of Community Development and Food Systems, Ohio State University When you think about the most dangerous jobs in America, does farming come to mind? Flipping tractors, unpredictable animals, chemical exposure and dangerous machinery make agriculture one of the most hazardous industries in the country. Little wonder that finding affordable health insurance is one of the most significant concerns facing American farmers, who are often self-employed. A survey funded by the US Department of Agriculture also found that concern deters young farmers from embracing the career.

Other Segments

Budget Deal Protects Workers' Tips

17 MINS

Guest: Nicole Hallett, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Law, and Director of the Community Justice Clinic, University at Buffalo In the restaurant business there’s a sort of class divide not unlike the upstairs/downstairs thing in Downtown Abbey – but it’s between the people who work in the front of the restaurant dealing with customers and the people who work in the back. When you leave a tip for your server, do you ever think about the line cooks or dishwashers who also made your meal possible? Would you like them to get a cut of what you’re leaving for the team that took your order, delivered your food and cleared your plates? This question of who should get a share of the tips is an ongoing, heated debate in the restaurant world, which both the Obama and Trump Administrations have waded into.

Guest: Nicole Hallett, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Law, and Director of the Community Justice Clinic, University at Buffalo In the restaurant business there’s a sort of class divide not unlike the upstairs/downstairs thing in Downtown Abbey – but it’s between the people who work in the front of the restaurant dealing with customers and the people who work in the back. When you leave a tip for your server, do you ever think about the line cooks or dishwashers who also made your meal possible? Would you like them to get a cut of what you’re leaving for the team that took your order, delivered your food and cleared your plates? This question of who should get a share of the tips is an ongoing, heated debate in the restaurant world, which both the Obama and Trump Administrations have waded into.