Should Companies Apologize?
  • Jun 22, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 14:23 mins

Guest: Daryl Koehn, PhD, Wicklander Chair in Professional Ethics at DePaul University, Recipient of 2017 Master Teacher in Ethics Award from BYU Wheatley Institution We learn in kindergarten to say we're sorry when we wrong someone. It's a basic tenet of good behavior. But only in the last decade or so has it become common for corporate CEOs to publicly apologize when their company makes a mistake. When it comes to corporate apologies, it turns out that saying sorry isn’t enough. Getting the apology just right really matters.

Other Segments

How to Tackle Cyber-Bullying

19 MINS

(originally aired Feb. 21, 2017) Guest: Carrie Goldman, Author of “Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear” According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, about half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Last year, during her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump said she had plans to make it her focus as First Lady. And rightfully so, since she and her 11-year-old son Barron have both experienced it firsthand before and after the election. Yet, five months after the inauguration, the First Lady has been slow to put anything specific in motion. Earlier this year, we spoke with Carrie Goldman about what parents and teachers can do to tackle the problem.

(originally aired Feb. 21, 2017) Guest: Carrie Goldman, Author of “Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear” According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, about half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Last year, during her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump said she had plans to make it her focus as First Lady. And rightfully so, since she and her 11-year-old son Barron have both experienced it firsthand before and after the election. Yet, five months after the inauguration, the First Lady has been slow to put anything specific in motion. Earlier this year, we spoke with Carrie Goldman about what parents and teachers can do to tackle the problem.