• Nov 19, 2018 10:00 pm
  • 16:15 mins

Guests: Ken Plummer, Consultant, Center for Teaching and Learning, BYU; Morgan Busch, Center for Teaching and Learning, BYU; Mike Alder, director of BYU Technology Transfer Office We talked about the shortcomings of math instruction in the US – too much attention on memorization and practice equations, too little actual problem solving. A team here at BYU is developing a system to help instructors create lessons that train students to think the way experts think.

Other Segments

The Future is Looking a Bit Hazy and Nuclear

19 MINS

Guest: Allison M. Macfarlane, Professor of Science Policy and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, George Washington University Nuclear power is fading in the US. Most of the nation’s 100 or so nuclear reactors are near the end of their 40-year-life-span initially approved by regulators. More than a dozen have become so expensive to maintain they are slated to be shut down permanently. The nation’s oldest commercial nuclear plant was 49-years-old – and it just closed down for good in Lacey, New Jersey. Meanwhile only one new nuclear power plant is currently under construction in the US.  But America’s nuclear safety rules and regulations were designed for building and maintaining plants, not tearing them down.

Guest: Allison M. Macfarlane, Professor of Science Policy and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, George Washington University Nuclear power is fading in the US. Most of the nation’s 100 or so nuclear reactors are near the end of their 40-year-life-span initially approved by regulators. More than a dozen have become so expensive to maintain they are slated to be shut down permanently. The nation’s oldest commercial nuclear plant was 49-years-old – and it just closed down for good in Lacey, New Jersey. Meanwhile only one new nuclear power plant is currently under construction in the US.  But America’s nuclear safety rules and regulations were designed for building and maintaining plants, not tearing them down.