The Sting of the Wild (18:17)

The Sting of the Wild (18:17)

The Lisa Show

Hair loss myths, developing regular family dinners and the downside of the "selfie".

Episode: Hair loss myths, developing regular family dinners and the downside of the "selfie".

  • Sep 24, 2018 5:00 pm
  • 19:10 mins

For some, being stung by a bee is the terror of every family picnic. But for entomologist Justin Schmidt, it’s just a normal day of research. In his book, The Sting of the Wild, Justin Schmidt describes how and why he allowed himself to be stung by 83 different types of insect, all in the name of science. He joins us now to discuss it further.

Other Segments

Learning Is Not Intuitive (53:44)

17m

We are all continuously learning. Babies learn to crawl, walk, and talk. Students learn in school, adults learn new job skills, and everyone constantly learns how to adapt to new situations and take in information. With all the practice we get, it seems like learning should be intuitive. But when it comes to purposefully learning and retaining information, the methods we naturally turn to aren’t really the most effective ones. So if you want to stop being unpleasantly surprised by how little information you retain, you’ll have to adopt some new methods of learning. Dr. Anne Cleary is a professor in the Cognitive Learning Program at Colorado State University, where she studies memory. Her courses include a class on the science of learning.

We are all continuously learning. Babies learn to crawl, walk, and talk. Students learn in school, adults learn new job skills, and everyone constantly learns how to adapt to new situations and take in information. With all the practice we get, it seems like learning should be intuitive. But when it comes to purposefully learning and retaining information, the methods we naturally turn to aren’t really the most effective ones. So if you want to stop being unpleasantly surprised by how little information you retain, you’ll have to adopt some new methods of learning. Dr. Anne Cleary is a professor in the Cognitive Learning Program at Colorado State University, where she studies memory. Her courses include a class on the science of learning.

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