what3words: Your Unique Global Address

what3words: Your Unique Global Address

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 723 , Segment 3

Episode: Stand-Off over Marijuana, Teens Helping Strangers, Burglar Personality Types

  • Jan 11, 2018
  • 20:44 mins

Guest: Chris Sheldrick, Co-Founder, CEO, what3words GPS navigation has changed the way we find our destinations. Who even gives directions anymore? But what if you’re trying to find a house in a brand-new neighborhood that Google hasn’t mapped yet? Or what about those times when you’re in a huge crowd, trying to tell your friend where to find you? “I’m left of the speakers, about two-thirds back from the stage. I’m wearing a red shirt.”  Or what if – and this is a lot more serious – what if, like billions of people in the developing world, you have no address. How do emergency services or deliveries find you? Without a precise address, you’re in some ways . . . invisible.  Chris Sheldrick wants to give an address – a specific label -  to every single location on Earth.

Other Segments

Trump Administration Takes Aim at Marijuana in States Where It's Legal

17m

Guest: Daniel McConkie, JD, Assistant Professor of Law, Northern Illinois University Voters in eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized recreational marijuana use – most recently California, where the law took effect just last week. More than a dozen other states allow marijuana use for medical purposes in a fairly broad fashion.  The problem is that federal law still says it’s illegal to grow, sell or use marijuana. And last week, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave federal prosecutors a green light to go after marijuana businesses in states that have legalized its use. This is a shift from the Obama Administration, which had federal prosecutors generally defer to state marijuana laws.

Guest: Daniel McConkie, JD, Assistant Professor of Law, Northern Illinois University Voters in eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized recreational marijuana use – most recently California, where the law took effect just last week. More than a dozen other states allow marijuana use for medical purposes in a fairly broad fashion.  The problem is that federal law still says it’s illegal to grow, sell or use marijuana. And last week, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave federal prosecutors a green light to go after marijuana businesses in states that have legalized its use. This is a shift from the Obama Administration, which had federal prosecutors generally defer to state marijuana laws.