Tribal Territory, Lincoln's Body, Negative Carbon Emissions

Tribal Territory, Lincoln's Body, Negative Carbon Emissions

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 32

  • Mar 26, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 1:43:37 mins

Tribal Territory VAWA Law (1:06) Guest: Michalyn Steele, BYU Law professor A federal law took effect this month giving Native American government’s authority to arrest and prosecute non-Indians who commit acts of domestic or dating violence while on tribal lands. Until now, tribal police could do little more than boot the non-Indian perpetrators off the reservation and hope they don’t come back.  “Many tribes will choose to comply. Even if it is not their first choice on how to handle internal domestic violence,” says Steele.  Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History (20:46) Guest: Richard Fox, history professor at the University of Southern California and author of the book Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History  What comes to mind when you think of Abraham Lincoln? Maybe the commander-in-chief during the civil war? His words at the Gettysburg address? Or how about the Emancipation Proclamation that began the process of freeing America’s slaves? Apparently, his political accomplishments were not the only focus during the 16th president’s time in office. Many were fascinated by his appearance which many characterized as homely.  “He seemed to be asymmetrical, too long in the legs and too short in torso. He was very tall. That was enough to make people think he was very strange. One of the most common adjectives to describe him was grotesque. He appeared to be almost alien," says Fox.  Negative Carbon Emissions (40:50) Guest: Klaus Lackner, director of the Center for Negative Carbon Emissions at Arizona State University  The Center for Negative Carbon Emissions at Arizona State University has a lofty goal: to suck carbon dioxide out of the air to help prevent climate change. With global CO2 emissions reaching unsustainable levels, the team at ASU has developed a technology to “capture” carbon dioxide from the air. The CO2 could then be used by industries that need it, or disposed safely without entering the atmosphere.  “If you look at what we put out right now, it comes out to be 30 billion tons of CO2 a year," says Lackner.  How Congress Works (51:49) Guest: Kelly Patterson, BYU political science professor  Republicans in Congress pulled off an unusual maneuver yesterday, when House Speaker John Boehner brought multiple versions of a budget to the floor for a vote as a way of ending a standoff over spending plans. Speaker Boehner has struggled to find consensus among Republicans in the House on tough issues, including the budget. This latest tactic is yet another of example of how backroom negotiation and procedural maneuvering has become central to getting anything done in Congress.  “The house is a majoritarian chamber. The senate is more collegial," says Patterson.  Loneliness (1:22:05) Guest: Tim Smith, professor in counseling psychology and special education at BYU  A new study released by the university says that there is a direct correlation between living longer and spending less time alone. "You can be lonely while having lots of people around you," explains Smith.

Episode Segments

Lincoln's Body: A Cultural History

20m

Guest: Richard Fox, history professor at the University of Southern California and author of the book Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History  What comes to mind when you think of Abraham Lincoln? Maybe the commander-in-chief during the civil war? His words at the Gettysburg address? Or how about the Emancipation Proclamation that began the process of freeing America’s slaves? Apparently, his political accomplishments were not the only focus during the 16th president’s time in office. Many were fascinated by his appearance which many characterized as homely.  “He seemed to be asymmetrical, too long in the legs and too short in torso. He was very tall. That was enough to make people think he was very strange. One of the most common adjectives to describe him was grotesque. He appeared to be almost alien," says Fox.

Guest: Richard Fox, history professor at the University of Southern California and author of the book Lincoln’s Body: A Cultural History  What comes to mind when you think of Abraham Lincoln? Maybe the commander-in-chief during the civil war? His words at the Gettysburg address? Or how about the Emancipation Proclamation that began the process of freeing America’s slaves? Apparently, his political accomplishments were not the only focus during the 16th president’s time in office. Many were fascinated by his appearance which many characterized as homely.  “He seemed to be asymmetrical, too long in the legs and too short in torso. He was very tall. That was enough to make people think he was very strange. One of the most common adjectives to describe him was grotesque. He appeared to be almost alien," says Fox.