Airline Near Misses
  • Jan 19, 2016 10:00 pm
  • 13:56 mins

Guest: Peter Madsen, PhD, Associate Professor of Organizational Leadership and Strategy at BYU  Taking a commercial flight is safer today than it’s ever been. Does that mean that no one in the crew made a mistake on that last flight you slept through? Of course not. According to organizational leadership expert Peter Madsen, potentially hazardous mistakes happen on 68% of commercial flights. Since so few of those mistakes end up causing any arm, Madsen says it’s easy—too easy—for airlines and crewmembers to get complacent about their own skill and the strength of their safety procedures.

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Minority Voters

20 MINS

Guest: Lisa Garcia Bedolla, PhD, Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Political Science Department at the University of California, Berkeley  Nearly a quarter of all eligible voters in the US are African American, Hispanic or Asian—which makes their support critical to candidates eyeing a victory in the 2016 presidential election.  Just how to make sure those minority voters actually go to the polls on Election Day is the challenge for campaigns. There’s been a lot of thought that high-tech solutions like texting or Facebook outreach could be the key to mobilizing both minority and young voters.  New analysis funded by the James Irvine Foundation finds old-fashioned methods, like going out and knocking on doors, are still best.

Guest: Lisa Garcia Bedolla, PhD, Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Political Science Department at the University of California, Berkeley  Nearly a quarter of all eligible voters in the US are African American, Hispanic or Asian—which makes their support critical to candidates eyeing a victory in the 2016 presidential election.  Just how to make sure those minority voters actually go to the polls on Election Day is the challenge for campaigns. There’s been a lot of thought that high-tech solutions like texting or Facebook outreach could be the key to mobilizing both minority and young voters.  New analysis funded by the James Irvine Foundation finds old-fashioned methods, like going out and knocking on doors, are still best.