America's Troubled Relationship with its Police

America's Troubled Relationship with its Police

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • May 31, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 26:03 mins

Guest: Samuel Walker, PhD, Emeritus Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska at Omaha Jury selection is underway in the trial of the Minnesota police officer who fatally shot Philando Castile last summer. Castile’s death was streamed on Facebook Live by his girlfriend and fueled the ongoing national debate over how police use deadly force and how they treat African Americans.  Samuel Walker explains the roots of America’s often fraught relationship with the police.

Other Segments

Can Everyone Eat Local?

14 MINS

Guest: Elliott Campbell, PhD, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Merced The “local food” movement has gone beyond a handful of hip, progressive towns to touch nearly every city in America. Farmer’s markets and locally-grown produce are fairly easy to find these days. But even the most devoted locavores have to get some of their diet from beyond the 50-mile radius generally considered the boundary of “local.”  If one day all Americans decided they wanted to eat only local food, would anybody starve? University of California-Merced’s Elliott Campbell analyzed food production and population trends across the country and found that, surprisingly, about 90 percent of the country could be fed by food grown nearby.

Guest: Elliott Campbell, PhD, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Merced The “local food” movement has gone beyond a handful of hip, progressive towns to touch nearly every city in America. Farmer’s markets and locally-grown produce are fairly easy to find these days. But even the most devoted locavores have to get some of their diet from beyond the 50-mile radius generally considered the boundary of “local.”  If one day all Americans decided they wanted to eat only local food, would anybody starve? University of California-Merced’s Elliott Campbell analyzed food production and population trends across the country and found that, surprisingly, about 90 percent of the country could be fed by food grown nearby.