The Children Act and Courts on Screen
  • Nov 20, 2018 10:00 pm
  • 20:08 mins

Guest: Kirsten Hawkes, ParentPreviews.com Parent Previews film reviewer Kirsten Hawkes has been thinking about how justice and the rule of law are depicted on screen. But we’re not talking about “A Few Good Men” or any of the John Grisham thrillers. Hawkes has a lineup of classic films that contemplate big questions about justice that could make for great family discussion fodder.

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Guest: Thomas Aiello, Associate Professor of History, Valdosta State University. Author of “Jim Crow’s Last Stand: Nonunanimous Criminal Jury Verdicts in Louisiana” The power of juries in America. We know they’re an important part of the criminal justice system. We know that when you get called to jury duty, you have to go. And you probably know that you’re charged with a serious crime, a jury of 12 people will have to come to a unanimous decision in order to convict you. But actually, that’s not true in Oregon. It’s the only state that does not require a unified jury to convict someone of a felony. Louisiana was in the same boat until just a few weeks ago when voters decided to require a unanimous verdict in felony criminal trials.