• Feb 1, 2016 11:00 pm
  • 34:33 mins

Guest: Sallie Permar, MD, Pediatrician and Director of Neonatal Viral Pathogen Immunity at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute In a matter of just over a week, the Zika Virus has jumped to the front page of US newspapers and has been the subject of emergency meetings at the CDC and World Health Organization. Pregnant women are being advised not to travel to countries where Zika is spreading because of the virus’ possible link to birth defects. Zika is a mosquito-borne illness that has spread to at least 23 countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. Officials in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador and Jamaica, are urging women not to get pregnant at all until the threat has passed.

Other Segments

Organ Donation

15 MINS

Guest: Nancy Scheper-Hughes, PhD, Professor of Medical Anthropology and Sociocultural Anthropology at UC Berkeley How desperate would you have to be to sell a kidney? Say you live in a third-world country, you’re mired in poverty and donating a kidney could fund an education for your child? Or, suppose you live in a war-torn country and a kidney could pay your passage to freedom?  These are extreme, but not necessarily uncommon, in the very active international market for buying and selling organs. But Medical Anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes says far too often the market is unkind to donors. She says having two kidneys doesn’t mean you’ve got a spare. Donors are often in poor health and worse-off financially after giving up a kidney.

Guest: Nancy Scheper-Hughes, PhD, Professor of Medical Anthropology and Sociocultural Anthropology at UC Berkeley How desperate would you have to be to sell a kidney? Say you live in a third-world country, you’re mired in poverty and donating a kidney could fund an education for your child? Or, suppose you live in a war-torn country and a kidney could pay your passage to freedom?  These are extreme, but not necessarily uncommon, in the very active international market for buying and selling organs. But Medical Anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes says far too often the market is unkind to donors. She says having two kidneys doesn’t mean you’ve got a spare. Donors are often in poor health and worse-off financially after giving up a kidney.