• Apr 20, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 15:46 mins

Guest: John Ivy, an emeritus professor in kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas, whose research specializes in exercise and human performance That iconic image of a winning football coach getting a bucket of Gatorade dumped on his head after the game could get a lot messier as new research about the benefits of chocolate milk catches on. Yes, chocolate milk. It is no longer just a childhood favorite or special indulgence. Researchers have found it also just might be the perfect beverage for athletes. “We put the cyclists through two experiments. In the first, they did 1½ hours of intense exercise and at the end did sprints to simulate a road race and to fatigue them. They did this on two occasions. The first occasion, they received chocolate milk as post exercise supplement. Then, 2 hours later, they received the chocolate milk again. In the second treatment, they received the same amount of calories but in carbohydrate form. Then, after 4 hours of recovery, we then had them complete a simulated cycling time trial, about 40 kilometers. What we found was, when the individuals received the chocolate milk for the recovery supplement, they were able to do time trial somewhere around 10% faster than when they received the carbohydrates," explains Ivy.

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Laws of War

34 MINS

Guest: Eric Jensen, BYU law professor The law of war is Top of Mind today as we kick things of with our monthly visit from BYU international law expert Eric Jensen. He is just back from a conference in Geneva, Switzerland debating the legality of a new generation of drone warfare. We also talk about the Blackwater guards who have recently be sentenced to lengthy prison terms for killing more than a dozen Iraqi civilians in a Baghdad traffic circle back in 2007. We also touch on the desertion charge now facing Bowe Bergdahl - the soldier who was freed nearly a year ago in exchange for several high-value Taliban leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay. “I would like to make a brief distinction between this idea of autonomous weapons and artificial intelligence,” says Jensen. “When people talk about killer robots sometimes what comes to mind is 'The Terminator' or a self-thinking machine

Guest: Eric Jensen, BYU law professor The law of war is Top of Mind today as we kick things of with our monthly visit from BYU international law expert Eric Jensen. He is just back from a conference in Geneva, Switzerland debating the legality of a new generation of drone warfare. We also talk about the Blackwater guards who have recently be sentenced to lengthy prison terms for killing more than a dozen Iraqi civilians in a Baghdad traffic circle back in 2007. We also touch on the desertion charge now facing Bowe Bergdahl - the soldier who was freed nearly a year ago in exchange for several high-value Taliban leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay. “I would like to make a brief distinction between this idea of autonomous weapons and artificial intelligence,” says Jensen. “When people talk about killer robots sometimes what comes to mind is 'The Terminator' or a self-thinking machine