• Mar 30, 2016 9:00 pm
  • 16:48 mins

Guest: Tim Bontemps, National NBA writer for The Washington Post  The mere mention of “Curry” has the power to make pro-basketball fans salivate. We’re talking Steph Curry, league MVP and point guard for the Golden State Warriors, which are on six wins away from having the best NBA season of all time. One sports announcer called Steph Curry “the baby-faced assassin” – his accuracy is deadly from the three-point line and beyond.  Curry went on to make ten of the fifteen three-point shots he took in that game last month against the Magic. He’s amazing to a watch, a fan favorite, to be sure. And he may also be changing the game of basketball.

Other Segments

Child Soldiers: Girls in Warfare

17 MINS

Guest: Liz Jevtic-Somlai, PhD, Visiting Professor of Political Science at BYU  A few years ago, a campaign group called Invisible Children released a movie that went viral – it’s been viewed more than 100 million times and came with a call to action: help catch infamous African warlord Joseph Kony.  That was 2012 and Joseph Kony is still free, still kidnapping children to make soldiers of them. Boys only 7 or 8 years old, given weapons, forced to commit atrocities. But not just boys. Visiting BYU political science professor Liz Jevtic-Somlai says the role of girls as child soldiers is often overlooked or misunderstood. Her research indicates girls are also some of the most challenging child soldiers to rehabilitate once the conflict ends.

Guest: Liz Jevtic-Somlai, PhD, Visiting Professor of Political Science at BYU  A few years ago, a campaign group called Invisible Children released a movie that went viral – it’s been viewed more than 100 million times and came with a call to action: help catch infamous African warlord Joseph Kony.  That was 2012 and Joseph Kony is still free, still kidnapping children to make soldiers of them. Boys only 7 or 8 years old, given weapons, forced to commit atrocities. But not just boys. Visiting BYU political science professor Liz Jevtic-Somlai says the role of girls as child soldiers is often overlooked or misunderstood. Her research indicates girls are also some of the most challenging child soldiers to rehabilitate once the conflict ends.