Psychology of White-Collar Criminals

The Matt Townsend Show - Season 1, Episode undefined

  • Jan 1, 2018 5:00 pm
  • 32:20 mins

Eugene F. Soltes, Ph.D., is a Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. His research focuses on how individuals and organizations confront and overcome challenging situations.  White-collar criminals are categorized as businessmen or government officials who commit a financially motivated but nonviolent crime. Eugene F. Soltes interviewed 50 former executives about their crimes to learn how they tick.  Dr. Soltes, author of the book Why They Do It: Inside The Mind of the White-Collar Criminal, dives deeper into the stories of these once seemingly successful business leaders.

Other Segments

The Leading Brain

43 MINS

Friederike Fabritius is the leading Neuroleadership expert at the Munich Leadership Group. As an executive coach and leadership specialist, she has extensive expertise working with top executives from multinational corporations such as Bayer, Audi, Montblanc, and EY. A neuropsychologist by education, Friederike focuses on developing new methods and practices for leadership development based on solid scientific findings.  Leadership has long been treated as an art, a fuzzy philosophy based more on fads than on facts. That accounts for the endless stream of “game-changing” management books that seem to come and go almost as rapidly as Paris fashions. It also explains why today’s leadership guru is often tomorrow’s forgotten footnote. But effective leadership isn’t an art. It’s a science

Friederike Fabritius is the leading Neuroleadership expert at the Munich Leadership Group. As an executive coach and leadership specialist, she has extensive expertise working with top executives from multinational corporations such as Bayer, Audi, Montblanc, and EY. A neuropsychologist by education, Friederike focuses on developing new methods and practices for leadership development based on solid scientific findings.  Leadership has long been treated as an art, a fuzzy philosophy based more on fads than on facts. That accounts for the endless stream of “game-changing” management books that seem to come and go almost as rapidly as Paris fashions. It also explains why today’s leadership guru is often tomorrow’s forgotten footnote. But effective leadership isn’t an art. It’s a science