• Apr 6, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 21:41 mins

Guest: Martine Leavitt, author of “Calvin,” winner of a Governor General’s Literary Award in 2016.   What if Calvin from the beloved comic strip Calvin and Hobbes wasn’t just a self-absorbed, hyperactive kid with an imaginary pet tiger? What if he was, instead, suffering from schizophrenia?  That thought inspired Martine Leavitt’s young adult book, “Calvin” which, in 2016, received one of the most prestigious literary awards in Canada: The Governor General’s Literary Award.

Other Segments

Fighting for the Right to Repair

16 MINS

Guest: Gay Gordon-Byrne, Executive Director of the Repair Association. Once upon a time, electronics were simple enough that someone with a repair manual and a bit of knowhow could figure out how to fix a broken TV, stereo or camera. But electronics are a lot more complicated today, and companies that make everything from cars to phones are working to prevent repairs from happening easily. They no longer provide repair manuals free of charge. They lock down the software that runs a device so repairs can only be done by the manufacturer – at a higher price than the corner store would have charged. And, in the case of many Apple products, just opening the device up to inspect its inner-workings is virtually impossible. So, now repair shops and consumer advocates are pushing back with legislation and lobbying aimed at reclaiming the “right to repair” electronics.

Guest: Gay Gordon-Byrne, Executive Director of the Repair Association. Once upon a time, electronics were simple enough that someone with a repair manual and a bit of knowhow could figure out how to fix a broken TV, stereo or camera. But electronics are a lot more complicated today, and companies that make everything from cars to phones are working to prevent repairs from happening easily. They no longer provide repair manuals free of charge. They lock down the software that runs a device so repairs can only be done by the manufacturer – at a higher price than the corner store would have charged. And, in the case of many Apple products, just opening the device up to inspect its inner-workings is virtually impossible. So, now repair shops and consumer advocates are pushing back with legislation and lobbying aimed at reclaiming the “right to repair” electronics.