Building a Quieter Airplane Toilet

Building a Quieter Airplane Toilet

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Trump Supporters and the Mid-Terms, Donate Your Voice, Building A Quieter Airplane Toilet

Episode: Trump Supporters and the Mid-Terms, Donate Your Voice, Building A Quieter Airplane Toilet

  • Apr 2, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 18:03 mins

Guest: Scott Sommerfeldt, PhD, Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy; Mike Alder, Tech Transfer Office, Brigham Young University  There are a lot of reasons to dislike the standard airplane bathroom. It’s so cramped, for one. But the noise. That toilet flushes so loudly I’ve sometimes wondered if it opens a portal straight to the outside of the plane. And how miserable is it if you’re stuck in a seat near the toilet? To be jolted out of your rest every time it flushes. Well, this is the very serious social problem BYU professor Scott Sommerfeldt has undertaken to solve.

Other Segments

Give Your Voice for Someone Without One

15m

Guest: Rupal Patel, PhD, Professor of Speech Pathology and Computer Science, Northeastern University, and CEO, VocaliD The late physicist Stephen Hawking’s computerized voice famously had an American accent, even though he was British. Why didn’t he have a British accent? Hawking explained on his website that, when he started using the technology, only the American accent was available and he just got attached to it. But speech pathologist Rupal Patel points out, that even today, there are just a handful of generic options for people using computerized devices to communicate. She’s developed a way to create custom voices based on the unique vocal characteristics of people who may only be able to make a few sounds. To do it, though, she needs a large bank of voice recordings donated by people like you and me. Donate your voice here.

Guest: Rupal Patel, PhD, Professor of Speech Pathology and Computer Science, Northeastern University, and CEO, VocaliD The late physicist Stephen Hawking’s computerized voice famously had an American accent, even though he was British. Why didn’t he have a British accent? Hawking explained on his website that, when he started using the technology, only the American accent was available and he just got attached to it. But speech pathologist Rupal Patel points out, that even today, there are just a handful of generic options for people using computerized devices to communicate. She’s developed a way to create custom voices based on the unique vocal characteristics of people who may only be able to make a few sounds. To do it, though, she needs a large bank of voice recordings donated by people like you and me. Donate your voice here.

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