Hair loss myths, developing regular family dinners and the downside of the "selfie".

Hair loss myths, developing regular family dinners and the downside of the "selfie".

The Lisa Show

  • Sep 24, 2018 5:00 pm
  • 1:44:40 mins
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Important conversations and encouraging words to help you make every day a great one. Strengthening Parent & Teen Relationships (0:37) As your child transitions to adolescence, your relationship might also experience some growing pains. You’ll likely be faced with more conflict and dissimilarity than ever before. Your response to these pressures will determine whether your relationship is strengthened or eroded. Dr. Carl Pickhardt has valuable advice for parents looking to maintain intimacy with their teenaged children. Dr. Pickhardt is a psychologist with both a counseling and public speaking practice. He is the author of 15 books on parenting. The Sting of the Wild (18:17) For some, being stung by a bee is the terror of every family picnic. But for entomologist Justin Schmidt, it’s just a normal day of research. In his book, The Sting of the Wild, Justin Schmidt describes how and why he allowed himself to be stung by 83 different types of insect, all in the name of science. He joins us now to discuss it further. The Myths Surrounding Hair Loss (37:27) Hair loss may not be life threatening, but for many it may cause self-esteem issues. Michelle Lindsay will discuss the many myths of hair loss and hair recovery treatments. She is a graduate of Idaho State University in Cosmetology and an American Board Certified Haircolorist. She has over 20 years of experience in the beauty industry and is a traveling artist and educator for Loreal Professional. Michelle has been featured in Hair Trend News, Stylecaster, UniqueArt, and is a contributor on HAIR.com. She has worked for photoshoots, films, and owns and operates Cultures Salon and shares her expertise at ColorGeekChic.com. Learning Is Not Intuitive (53:44) We are all continuously learning. Babies learn to crawl, walk, and talk. Students learn in school, adults learn new job skills, and everyone constantly learns how to adapt to new situations and take in information. With all the practice we get, it seems like learning should be intuitive. But when it comes to purposefully learning and retaining information, the methods we naturally turn to aren’t really the most effective ones. So if you want to stop being unpleasantly surprised by how little information you retain, you’ll have to adopt some new methods of learning. Dr. Anne Cleary is a professor in the Cognitive Learning Program at Colorado State University, where she studies memory. Her courses include a class on the science of learning. Selfies and Self Esteem (1:10:49) In 1839, Robert Cornelius took the world’s “first selfie.” Almost two hundred years later, the word “selfie” was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2013. From politicians to celebrities to elementary-aged kids, “selfie-culture” is a growing trend that surrounds us everywhere we go. But this self-obsessive phenomenon may have larger consequences than we imagine. A national survey by Psychology Today reveals that people are more unhappy with how they look now, than ever before. And selfies may have something to do with it. To understand more, we’re joined by Dr. Christia Sears Brown, a psychologist from the University of Kentucky. The Importance of Family Dinner (1:27:24) Recent studies have demonstrated great benefits from having regular family dinners. Yet getting this habit in place if often difficult. Carrie Rhodes is our guest and offers many ideas of how to get family dinners working in your home.

Episode Segments

Learning Is Not Intuitive (53:44)

17m

We are all continuously learning. Babies learn to crawl, walk, and talk. Students learn in school, adults learn new job skills, and everyone constantly learns how to adapt to new situations and take in information. With all the practice we get, it seems like learning should be intuitive. But when it comes to purposefully learning and retaining information, the methods we naturally turn to aren’t really the most effective ones. So if you want to stop being unpleasantly surprised by how little information you retain, you’ll have to adopt some new methods of learning. Dr. Anne Cleary is a professor in the Cognitive Learning Program at Colorado State University, where she studies memory. Her courses include a class on the science of learning.

We are all continuously learning. Babies learn to crawl, walk, and talk. Students learn in school, adults learn new job skills, and everyone constantly learns how to adapt to new situations and take in information. With all the practice we get, it seems like learning should be intuitive. But when it comes to purposefully learning and retaining information, the methods we naturally turn to aren’t really the most effective ones. So if you want to stop being unpleasantly surprised by how little information you retain, you’ll have to adopt some new methods of learning. Dr. Anne Cleary is a professor in the Cognitive Learning Program at Colorado State University, where she studies memory. Her courses include a class on the science of learning.

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