• Mar 2, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 13:36 mins

(51:57) Guest: Lewis Borck, PhD. Candidate in Anthropology at the University of Arizona  A Pew Research study done in 2010 said that a little more than four-in-ten American adults know most or all of their neighbors. Maybe we just don’t feel the need to be as connected to those who live near us. Or maybe it’s the fault of Facebook and Instagram, making us feel connected online, while being isolated in the real world. Whatever the reason, researchers at the University of Arizona say you might want to focus a little more on building connections with your neighbors. Pottery unearthed in the American southwest show the bigger your social circle, the better you’re equipped to handle a crisis like a natural disaster.  “We can actually watch large groups of multiple villages and multiple cities and how they are coming together and how they treat their neighbors and persist or survive in a difficult time. You are more likely to survive in a crisis if you are socially connected to people in your area,” says Brock.

Other Segments

Parent Previews: Lazarus Effect and Leonard Nimoy

13 MINS

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Guests: Rod & Kerry Gustafson of Parent Previews  A moment of reflection now, on the passing of TV and film star Leonard Nimoy – best known as Dr. Spock, of course. Considering how iconic his character and the TV show Star Trek have become, it’s incredible to think the original series only aired for three seasons from 1966 to 1969. It’s been in reruns constantly since then – which is how I came to know and love Nimoy as Spock during my childhood. And of course, there have been countless spin offs and remakes of the original.  Nimoy died Friday at the age of 83 from chronic lung disease. And we start with him today as we connect with Rod Gustafson and Kerry Bennett of Parent Previews for our weekly chat about film.  “He had a lot of talent,” says Rod Gustafson about Leonard Nimoy.  "There's this conflict between science and religion in this movie, but it's all zombies by the end

Tech Transfer

24 MINS

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”

Guests: Bryan Morse, Professor of Computer Science at BYU  David Brown, with the BYU Technology Transfer Office  As digital cameras get more advanced—and even allow people to capture 3-D video—the editing software needs to keep pace.  “We’re all used to going to the movies and seeing 3-d movies. Those are done with stereo cameras. Just the same way stereo has 2 speakers and you get a richer volume of sound, the same is with visual audio,” says Morse.  “I try to teach my students that anything that we do,” says Morse, “a user can do interactively if they spend enough time on it. Our goal is to save people time. The more we can automate the more and more value there is for the users. We want to do the heavy lifting and save the people from doing the tedious part of the process.”