Fermentation, Soy, Sourdough, Fake Countries

Fermentation, Soy, Sourdough, Fake Countries

Constant Wonder

  • Mar 6, 2020 7:00 pm
  • 1:41:02 mins

The Wonderful World of Ferments Guest: Kirsten K. Shockey, co-author with Christopher Shockey, of "Fiery Ferments," best-selling "Fermented Vegetables," and the new book "Miso, Tempeh, Natto & Other Tasty Ferments: A Step-by-Step Guide to Fermenting Grains and Beans” Fermented foods include an incredible nutrient-rich diversity of foods, provide alternative food sources, and are just plain fascinating. Marcus samples some of these living foods on the air. What's In This? Soy Guest: Christine M. Du Bois, author, "The Story of Soy," and former researcher and manager of the Johns Hopkins Project on Soy Soy is one of the most globally consequential crops of the modern era, and its production has changed the eating habits of humans and animals alike, not always for the better. It has a long, fascinating history, one that involves Henry Ford.  Sourdough Library Guest: Karl de Smedt, librarian, Sourdough Library, Puratos baking company What's in the vaults of the Sourdough Library? How many different starts? How old are they? This curator combs the world for unique sourdough and makes sure it's preserved for posterity. The Land that Never Was Guest: Maria Konnikova, journalist and author, "The Confidence Game: Why We Fall For It . . . Every Time" Gregor MacGregor used his superior storytelling ability to fool hundreds into believing in a promised land that didn't exist. Sadly, many people lost their lives trying to find it. Why are great con artists so good? They're selling us what we already want to buy.  Atlantis: An Ancient Allegory Guest: Stephen Kershaw, Oxford University Department for Continuing Education, and author, "The Search for Atlantis: A History of Plato’s Ideal State," and most recently "Barbarians: Rebellion and Resistance to the Roman Empire" Atlantis is a Platonic, mythical allegory demonstrating the corruption of a previously moral society. But most people don't care about the allegory, they just want to find a mystical city. Plato would shake his head in disbelief if he could see what we've done with his tale.