Cancer Treatment Drug Surprisingly Effective in Allergy Reduction

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Sep 26, 2018 9:00 pm
  • 16:52 mins

Guest: Bruce Bochner, Professor, Medicine, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine Nearly 15 million Americans have potentially life-threatening food allergies. Many live in constant fear that an allergen will sneak into their food and cause possibly fatal anaphylaxis.  For food allergies like that, there really isn’t much that can be done to alleviate that fear. Now, a team of scientists is repurposing a cancer drug that may have broad capacity to block allergies. Ibrutinib (eye-broot-in-ib) is a cancer drug used to treat Leukemia through less-toxic means than chemotherapy. Could it also tackle allergies? It’s all very preliminary, but early results are promising.

Other Segments

When Teachers Rise Up and Resist

24 MINS

Guest: Doris Santoro, PhD, Associate Professor, Education and Chair of the Education Department, Bowdoin College Many of America’s teachers are unhappy. In states across the country, from West Virginia to Washington State, teachers have marched on state capitols and held strikes this year. They want better pay, smaller classrooms, better financial support for programs. Many oppose state and federal rules that require teachers to use certain textbooks or give their students high-pressure tests. But when teachers are protesting, they’re not in the classroom doing their jobs. Is it possible for teachers to resist and press for change in their profession without derailing the education of the children in their care? Listen to

Guest: Doris Santoro, PhD, Associate Professor, Education and Chair of the Education Department, Bowdoin College Many of America’s teachers are unhappy. In states across the country, from West Virginia to Washington State, teachers have marched on state capitols and held strikes this year. They want better pay, smaller classrooms, better financial support for programs. Many oppose state and federal rules that require teachers to use certain textbooks or give their students high-pressure tests. But when teachers are protesting, they’re not in the classroom doing their jobs. Is it possible for teachers to resist and press for change in their profession without derailing the education of the children in their care? Listen to