Tech Transfer: Lab on a Chip
  • Sep 14, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 17:47 mins

Guests: Aaron Hawkins, Ph.D, Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer office. More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu  A major hurdle in the fight to prevent disease outbreaks like Ebola—or the spread of drug-resistant bacteria—is the time it takes to identify the problem. The results of a blood test can take several days to come back, during which you might be taking an antibiotic that’s not helping because you’ve got bacteria resistant to that drug. In the case of Ebola, often by the time the virus is evident in a blood test, you’ve already got a serious problem on your hands.  And so, scientists are working to come up with faster, cheaper tests. BYU Micro Engineering professor Aaron Hawkins has spent ten years coming up with what amounts to a “lab on a chip.”

Other Segments

Reshuffling of Marine Life

16 MINS

Guest: Ben Halpern, Ph.D., Professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and an Associate at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)  Raging wild fires in the West and shrinking ice caps at the poles are two of the more visible effects of a changing climate. But two-thirds of the Earth is underwater, and life there is changing, too.  A group of scientists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) has set out to understand how. Their latest findings suggest that as ocean temperatures rise, marine life begins to search for more suitable conditions, which has consequences for biodiversity and for communities such as fishermen who live off the sea.

Guest: Ben Halpern, Ph.D., Professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and an Associate at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)  Raging wild fires in the West and shrinking ice caps at the poles are two of the more visible effects of a changing climate. But two-thirds of the Earth is underwater, and life there is changing, too.  A group of scientists affiliated with UC Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) has set out to understand how. Their latest findings suggest that as ocean temperatures rise, marine life begins to search for more suitable conditions, which has consequences for biodiversity and for communities such as fishermen who live off the sea.