Presidential Leadership, Cyber-Bullying, Single-Sex Schools

Presidential Leadership, Cyber-Bullying, Single-Sex Schools

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Feb 22, 2017
  • 1:44:53 mins
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Presidential Leadership Guest: Donald Nieman, PhD, Presidential Historian, Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, Binghamton University, State University of New York Fresh off the national President’s Day Holiday and the start of Donald Trump’s second month in office, let’s look at the question of “acting presidential.” A fair amount of criticism lobbed in Trump’s direction during the campaign - and since his inauguration - relates to his unorthodox approach to the presidency: he calls people names on Twitter; he holds rambling press conferences in which he complains at length about how the media is covering him; he’s turned his nose up at Camp David in favor of retreating to his ritzy private club in Florida every weekend since he took office. Is it all just a matter of individual style? Or might President Trump learn from the way some of his predecessors behaved in office? Read Donald Nieman's article from Newsweek here. How to Tackle Cyber-Bullying Guest: Carrie Goldman, Anti-Bullying Educator and author of “Bullied: What Every Parent, Teacher, and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear” According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, about half of young people have experienced some form of cyberbullying. Melania Trump has said she plans to make it her focus as First Lady – the social media culture has gotten “too mean and tough,” she said in a speech just before the election. She and her 10-year-old son Barron have both experienced it firsthand. Let’s consider what parents and teachers can do to tackle the problem.  An American Family’s Ex-Pat Life in India Guest: Paul Frost, Foreign Commercial Service Officer, US Department of Commerce, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Tracie Frost, Student of Accounting, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton It’s a rare American family that has the opportunity to uproot and move overseas to live and work. It’s an even rarer family that accepts a long-term post to a place unlike home in every imaginable way. India was that place for Paul and Tracie Frost who had never lived abroad as a family before Paul left his banking job in North Carolina to join the foreign commercial service and took an assignment in New Delhi. Their four kids were 2, 6, 9 and 12 years of age. Paul and Tracie Frost have just returned from two and a half years living and working with their family in India and are now living in Florida. Bulletproof Origami Guest: Larry Howell, PhD, Professor and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Technology, BYU Cranes, paper hats, paper airplanes…Origami is an elementary school favorite and, for those who are really good, a delicate art form. Recently, though, an engineering team at BYU discovered that origami can also save lives. They took an origami structure, and turned it into a bullet-proof shield for police. Single Sex Schools Guest: Lise Eliot, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Rosalind Franklin University in Chicago; author of "Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow Into Troublesome Gaps and What We Can Do About It" More and more single-sex schools have popped up in the last decade as a way to close the “gender gap” between boys and girls in education. If we separate them, we can tailor the curriculum to their different learning styles, the thinking goes. Hopefully, boys will learn better communication and behavioral skills while girls will be more likely to embrace math and science when they’re free of the social pressure and stereotypes that pervade mixed-gender classrooms. Worlds Awaiting Guest:Rachel Wadham, Host of BYUradio’s “Worlds Awaiting” Rachel Wadham joins us now in studio. She’s the education and juvenile collections librarian here at BYU and host of Worlds Awaiting on BYUradio. It’s a show dedicated to encouraging a love of reading and discovery in children. It airs Saturdays at 1:30 p.m. Eastern and you can also hear it weekdays at 8:30 p.m. Eastern on BYUradio.

Episode Segments

An American Family's Ex-Pat Life in India

Feb 22, 2017

Guest: Paul Frost, Foreign Commercial Service Officer, US Department of Commerce, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Tracie Frost, Student of Accounting, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton It’s a rare American family that has the opportunity to uproot and move overseas to live and work. It’s an even rarer family that accepts a long-term post to a place unlike home in every imaginable way. India was that place for Paul and Tracie Frost who had never lived abroad as a family before Paul left his banking job in North Carolina to join the foreign commercial service and took an assignment in New Delhi. Their four kids were 2, 6, 9 and 12 years of age. Paul and Tracie Frost have just returned from two and a half years living and working with their family in India and are now living in Florida.

Guest: Paul Frost, Foreign Commercial Service Officer, US Department of Commerce, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Tracie Frost, Student of Accounting, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton It’s a rare American family that has the opportunity to uproot and move overseas to live and work. It’s an even rarer family that accepts a long-term post to a place unlike home in every imaginable way. India was that place for Paul and Tracie Frost who had never lived abroad as a family before Paul left his banking job in North Carolina to join the foreign commercial service and took an assignment in New Delhi. Their four kids were 2, 6, 9 and 12 years of age. Paul and Tracie Frost have just returned from two and a half years living and working with their family in India and are now living in Florida.