All You Can Ever Know: An Adoption Story
  • Jan 9, 2019 11:00 pm
  • 23:51 mins

Guest: Nicole Chung, Editor-in-Chief of Catapult Magazine and Author of “All You Can Ever Know” Nearly all infant adoptions in America today allow for some contact between the birth and adoptive families. Until the last decade or so, the opposite was true. Adoptions were routinely closed and adoptive families shunned contact with birth parents. That was the case for Nicole Chung, who was born severely premature and raised by a white family in Oregon after being placed for adoption by her Korean parents.

Other Segments

A Breakthrough on Getting Brain Scans on Children with Autism

12 MINS

Guests: Terisa Gabrielsen, Assistant Professor of School Psychology, BYU; Ryan Kellems, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, BYU; Mikle South, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, BYU  To undergo an MRI, you lie down and slide into a huge machine that makes loud noises while you hold completely still for up to 45 minutes. It’s a stressful thing for anyone –but for a child with autism, it can be totally overwhelming. Which is why not much brain scan research has been done to understand the neuroscience behind autism. But a team of researchers at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah have developed a technique to ease the MRI process for autistic children.

Guests: Terisa Gabrielsen, Assistant Professor of School Psychology, BYU; Ryan Kellems, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, BYU; Mikle South, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, BYU  To undergo an MRI, you lie down and slide into a huge machine that makes loud noises while you hold completely still for up to 45 minutes. It’s a stressful thing for anyone –but for a child with autism, it can be totally overwhelming. Which is why not much brain scan research has been done to understand the neuroscience behind autism. But a team of researchers at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah have developed a technique to ease the MRI process for autistic children.