• Mar 9, 2017
  • 17:53 mins

Guest: Shannon K. O'Neil, Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies, Director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Program, Council on Foreign Relations. A massive bribery scandal has broken out in Latin America. It involves a giant construction company not well-known in the United States. But in Brazil, where the company is based – and across Latin America, really – this company, called Odebrecht – is a major player in large construction projects like bridges, office towers and stadiums. The company has admitted to paying nearly 800-million dollars in bribes to win lucrative construction contracts in 12 different countries. The sordid details of it all are still emerging, and as they do, government officials and politicians across Latin America are being outed as bribe-takers.

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Protecting Syria's Treasures

25 MINS

Guest: Amr Al-Azm, PhD, Associate Professor of History and Anthropology, Shawnee State University, Ohio Next week marks the 6th anniversary of the start of the Syrian Civil War that has left hundreds of thousands dead and forced millions to flee their homes. In the years before war broke out between Syria’s Assad regime and his opponents, archaeologist Amr Al-Azm was head of science and conservation in the Antiquities Department of the Syrian government and a professor at the University of Damascus. But political pressure and frustration with the Assad regime led Al-Azm to leave Syria. He spent several years as a visiting professor at BYU before taking his current position as a professor of history and anthropology at Shawnee State University in Ohio, where he also coordinates international efforts to protect Syria’s antiquities from looting and destruction.

Guest: Amr Al-Azm, PhD, Associate Professor of History and Anthropology, Shawnee State University, Ohio Next week marks the 6th anniversary of the start of the Syrian Civil War that has left hundreds of thousands dead and forced millions to flee their homes. In the years before war broke out between Syria’s Assad regime and his opponents, archaeologist Amr Al-Azm was head of science and conservation in the Antiquities Department of the Syrian government and a professor at the University of Damascus. But political pressure and frustration with the Assad regime led Al-Azm to leave Syria. He spent several years as a visiting professor at BYU before taking his current position as a professor of history and anthropology at Shawnee State University in Ohio, where he also coordinates international efforts to protect Syria’s antiquities from looting and destruction.