Brexit, High Heel Prosthetic, Mental Health Stigma

Brexit, High Heel Prosthetic, Mental Health Stigma

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jun 22, 2016 11:00 pm
  • 1:42:02 mins

Brexit and Security, Police Searches, Moon Exploration, Dividing Iraq  Guest: Eric Jensen, JD, Professor of International Law in BYU’s J. Reuben Clark Law School Thursday is the long-awaited referendum in which British voters will decide whether to stay in the European Union or not. As we welcome international legal expert Eric Jensen back to the studio, we’re asking what legal and national security questions might arise from a Brexit.  High Heel Prosthetic Guests: James Gilman, MD, Executive Director of the Military and Veterans Health Institute at Johns Hopkins; Luke Brown, Recent Graduate of Mechanical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University Prosthetic feet and legs today are so advanced they make it possible for people with an amputation to walk, run and jump. But wearing high-heels has been out of the question until now.  Engineering students at Johns Hopkins University have come up with a prosthetic foot design that adjusts to work with flats and high-heeled shoes. Men might be surprised to learn how important it is for a woman to have that option. Apple Seed Guest: Sam Payne, Host of BYUradio’s “The Apple Seed” Sam Payne joins us in studio each week with insights on tellers and stories. Mental Health Stigma Guest: Dan Lannin, PhD, Psychology Graduate Student at Iowa State University One in five adult Americans suffer from some sort of mental health problem. But although treatment exists, only about half of people with serious mental disorders actually seek help. The stigma attached to mental illness is a major reason for that. Iowa State University researchers found the stigma is so powerful it can even prevent people from clicking on a link to learn more about mental health treatment. Somehow just the act of looking for information in private is shameful to many because of the stigma around mental illness.  Foster Youth Program Guests: Xochitl Sanchez, Co-Founder and Director of the Guardian Scholars Program at San Francisco State University; Sokhom Mao, Guardian Scholars Program Participant, Community Engagement Officer at Sunny Hills Services There are hundreds of thousands of foster youth in America today and only six percent of those youth earn a college degree according to a study at the University of Chicago. Why is that number so low and what can be done about it? The Guardian Scholars Program at San Francisco State University provides a model that’s been working for a decade now. The program fills the void of emotional and financial support young people typically get from parents in getting into college and sticking it out to graduation.