• Jun 21, 2019 10:00 pm
  • 14:20 mins

(Originally aired February 19, 2019) Guest: Noel Straatsma, LEGO Master Model Builder, LEGOLAND Discovery Centre Toronto The great thing about summer, for so many kids, is the long hours of uninterrupted play: riding bikes until the sun sets; devouring a new book from cover to cover (that was me); or undertaking an ambitious LEGO project without any distractions. Back in February, as the latest LEGO Movie came out, we met a man who turned his childhood hours building LEGO into a profession. He’s an honest-to-goodness Master Builder for LEGOLAND Discovery Centre in Toronto.

Other Segments

Kossula's Story of Enslavement, Published 87 Years After It Was Written

23 MINS

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”

(Originally aired July 20, 2018) Guest: Deborah G. Plant, Literary Critic and Editor of “Barracoon: The Story of the Last ‘Black Cargo’” Written by Zora Neale Hurston The last ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States came after the Atlantic Slave trade had already been banned. So the owners of the Clotilde unloaded their illicit cargo secretly and then sank the ship to hide their crime. The remains of the Clotilde were found last month in Alabama’s Mobile River. It’s a major historical discovery that makes this next conversation worth another listen. One of the enslaved men aboard the Clotilde was Cudjo Lewis. In 1927, when he was 86 years old, he told his story to ethnographer and novelist Zora Neale Hurston, but she couldn’t get it published. That changed last year, when it was published posthumously and became a bestseller. It’s called “Barracoon.”